"None of us could really believe it."

The world was taken by surprise when the sudden announcement about an opening between East and West Berlin was made 25 years ago. The best known division between East and West Europe was about to crumble, signaling a significant step in the reunification of Europe.

Here is a look back at how The Washington Post covered the fall of the Berlin Wall.

The front page of The Post, the day after the wall fell

"In the most stunning step since world war II toward ending the East-West divide of Europe."

Iconic photos from the days following the announcement

Nov. 12, 1989: The opening of the Berlin Wall at Potsdamer Platz. East Germans poured through the newly opened wall, as a West Berliner cheered them on from on top.

Nov. 14, 1989: West Berliners kiss in front of the Brandenburg Gate, with East German border guards standing atop of the Berlin Wall.

November, 1989:  An East German woman gives flowers to West German border guards at the opening of the Berlin Wall at Potsdamer Platz.

From the opinion pages: Madeleine Albright

"The same forces that brought change in Poland, Hungary and East Germany -- even Bulgaria -- stir in Czechoslovakia."

Analysis from David Ignatius

"The issue that should concern crass pragmatists right now, as we watch the breakup of the Soviet empire, is who will get the spoils?"

What next: Looking ahead

"With the speed that no one could have anticipated even a year ago, Western Europe is moving toward a more united economy just as Eastern Europe is beginning to build a free-market system."

Related Berlin Wall coverage

The fall of the Berlin Wall

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Nov. 11, 1989 | An East German border guard looks to the West through an opening in the Berlin Wall. The next day, Nov. 12, East Germans dismantled the wall at Potsdamer Platz, allowing East and West Germans to travel freely between the two Berlins. (Richard A. Lipski/The Washington Post)

The fall of the Berlin Wall

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Nov. 11, 1989 | An East German border guard looks to the West through an opening in the Berlin Wall. The next day, Nov. 12, East Germans dismantled the wall at Potsdamer Platz, allowing East and West Germans to travel freely between the two Berlins. (Richard A. Lipski/The Washington Post)