AVLONA, Greece — Greeks are facing a mega cash-crunch with banks closed and ATM withdrawals limited to 60 euros ($66.60) per day.

As my colleague Ylan Q. Mui and I wrote Friday, while the government's latest bailout proposal was reviewed, "In the balance is whether Greece remains part of the 19-nation euro bloc or drops into a fiscal abyss that would leave banks without cash and drive the country back to its former currency, the drachma."

[Greece’s latest bailout request is under review as hopes rise for deal]

While any Greek with a debit card can spend their daily bank limit at supermarkets or other establishments that accept them, some locations are accepting cash only.

In Avlona, north of Athens, here’s a peek at what 60 euros a day can buy you:

  • Four gallons of gas (15.1 liters) / 24.8 euros ($27.48)

(Anthony Faiola/The Washington Post)
  • Metro ticket (one) / 1.40 euros ($1.55)
  • Chicken (one, whole) / 4.54 euros ($5.04)
  • Coffee (one package) / 3.86 euros ($4.28)
  • Local white wine (one bottle) / 5.50 euros ($6.10)

(Anthony Faiola/The Washington Post)
  • Greek yogurt (one package) / 3.30 euros ($3.66)
  • Olive oil (one liter) / 6.27 euros ($6.95)
  • Feta cheese (400 grams) / 4.66 euros ($5.11)
  • Onions (1 kilo) / 0.46 euros ($0.51)

(Anthony Faiola/The Washington Post)
  • Lemons (1 kilo) / 2.44 euros ($2.70)
  • Peppers (1 kilo) / 1.38 euros ($1.53)
  • Tomatoes (1 kilo) / 1.25 euros ($1.39)

Read more at WorldViews:

How Greece went from victory to economy-destroying defeat

In Greece, Chanel becomes more valuable than cash

How one weeping man put a face on Greece’s debt crisis