Rami Jarrah, a Syrian journalist with the opposition Activist News Association, is currently in Aleppo reporting on the impact of intensified airstrikes on the portion of the city controlled by Syrian rebels. Most of the strikes these days are being carried out by Russian warplanes, he says, and they appear to be quite random.

As he moves around the city documenting the aftermath of the bombings, he has been photographing the people he meets. The photos, posted on Instagram, offer a haunting glimpse into the lives of those living with the daily terror of bombs falling from the sky. Some of them lost children; others are children, grappling with horrors they are barely old enough to understand.

I call him the lonely soldier. He still wants to play in the streets outside, he's become very attached to an almost mountain of rubble just a few feet away from his front door. But his father yells at him "No Sari, you can't do that, that's wrong" The reason for my visit was a dreadful one and the father screamed his hearts pain at me explaining what had happened, "I never got the chance to say goodbye to them" he repeated this agin and again. He then pelleted through the small corridor of his house passing me my shoes to put them back on and said "come, I want to show you where it all happened" As we walked out through the narrow pathway and began climbing the rocks, Sari was behind his fathers steps one step ahead of mine, his father gently pushed him back as he made his way to the top of the pile then turned around and said to me "This is where it landed" Of course he was referring to the attack that had killed Sari's mother and two brothers, Here I looked at Sari and saw him with his back to the wall scraping pebbles with his right foot outwards as though discreetly trying to dig his way down. His father saw what had caught my attention then grabbed him and walked us back down. As we were suppose to walk back into the house I crouched down to Sari and asked him why he wanted to play with that pile of rubble. Shy, he leveled his sight to the floor with his father very tense standing halfway through the front door. It was a long silence and so I managed to take this shot just before he told me "my mother and brothers are there I want to show them to my father so he can say goodbye to them" #SyriaSpeaks #Aleppo #Syria #FF #Photographer #Photography #Me #Love #l4l #tbt #death #childhood #oldcity #irony

A photo posted by Rami Jarrah (@alexanderpagesy) on

They had their hands deep in the rubble, rapidly trying to clear it out to save those that were stuck deep under. The plane had struck a residential alleway in the old city of Aleppo and the civil defense who were responsible for such rescue operations had still not arrived. Panicking locals shouted and begged them to move faster as they dug through the pile of rocks that had stretched across this small neighbourhood. They both went on tirelessly scraping, lifting and plunging rocks with not a moment's rest. The civil defense who were much praised for their work were usually quick to respond only this time to make it almost half an hour after the actual attack. When they came rushing through the the narrow alleyway the residents turned to them and pointed the way; "dig here, please dig here" they yelled. All eyes were on them now those desperate around them dependent to them. The two young men who were digging throughout this whole time, moved aside with their arms on their hips they seemed to not want to be noticed looking around them and brushing off the dust on their clothes as if just to not stand still they slowly pulled back to the wall. Their effort had almost gone unoticed by the panicking families who couldn't focus on anything but getting those trapped out. I was filming for a report on the incident and wanted to get the shots of the civil defense arriving at the scene but this really couldn't wait so I walked over to them and showed them this picture and said: "both of you are hero's, thank you for what you've done" #SyriaSpeaks #Aleppo #Syria #RealVolunteers

A photo posted by Rami Jarrah (@alexanderpagesy) on

I was outside waiting for a friend getting some things from the grocery store just by where I'm staying here in Aleppo, then the old man behind the counter waved at me with a gesture to come in, i had only been to the store once before and was generally a stranger in the area. I walked into the store which was dark and dusty, the exterior part was busted down by what looked like a mortar attack whilst inside the shelves were half empty and there stood the old man with a generous smile in his face, he asked me "son did you not buy two bottles of water from here the other day?" I said yes and he shook his head placing his hand in his pocket whilst saying "I thought you would never come back, I made a mistake and I owe you some money, here you go son" Astonished, I stared at the man for a few seconds then asked him if he could wait for just a moment I ran out to the car to get my camera, call me a drama queen but I felt the consideration of this elder man was incredible. That in such harsh times there are people who can not avoid honesty it seems to be in their blood. When I came back in with my camera in my hand he said "no young man please I can't have my picture taken as I travel back and forth to regime Aleppo. My children are there I cannot jeopardize that" I told him I would keep the picture for me and would never publish it, he trusted me and so I did. This picture here we both agreed I could publish #Photographer #Aleppo #Syria #War #Justice #Elder #Wise #Money #Business #l4l #FF

A photo posted by Rami Jarrah (@alexanderpagesy) on