Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses the media in Vancouver, B.C., on March 2. (Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press via AP)

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wants an "iconic Canadian woman" to be the face of his country's newest banknotes.

And so it shall be.

"I am pleased to announce today, right here, that a Canadian woman will be featured on the very first of the next series of bills expected in 2018," Trudeau said at a news conference on Tuesday to mark International Women's Day.

The Canadian $20 note currently features Queen Elizabeth, but she's not Canadian. The last series of $50 banknotes included images of five notable Canadian women, but they were replaced with the image of an icebreaker. An online petition asking the country's bank to commit to featuring more Canadian women has received more than 73,000 signatures so far.


A previous iteration of the $50 bank note, featuring the "Famous Five," who fought for women's rights. (Bank of Canada)

The latest version of the $50 bank note, which features an icebreaker. (Bank of Canada)

It's not clear yet which bill will feature women, CBC reported.

Trudeau is a self-proclaimed feminist, a label that he has previously said men and women "shouldn’t be afraid of."

“In this country we can be immensely proud of a long line of strong women who have stepped up time and time again to make history against all odds,” Trudeau said Tuesday, Global News reported.

The move by the Bank of Canada follows public calls to feature important women from Canadian history on the country's banknotes. Those calls mirror similar efforts in the United States, where the Obama administration announced last summer that a woman will be featured on a redesigned $10 bill starting in 2020. The U.S. Treasury Department will solicit suggestions from the public about who should be featured.

In Canada, the public has until April 15 to nominate a Canadian woman for the new banknote. Canadians can't nominate fictional characters, and nominees have to have died before April 15, 1991.

"The nominee can be any Canadian woman (by birth or naturalization) who has demonstrated outstanding leadership, achievement or distinction in any field benefiting the people of Canada or in the service of Canada," according to the Bank of Canada.

A council of prominent academic and cultural leaders, selected after public consultation, will create a shortlist from the nominations to submit to the minister of finance.