A young couple with faces paint in European, left, and British colors, pose with a sign "Our Love For Great Britain" during a Kiss Marathon event at Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany, Sunday June 19, 2016 to support the ' Remain' voters in Britain's referendum. (Joerg Carstensen/dpa via AP)

Imagine sitting alone at home, too sad to go out and too overwhelmed with frustration to do anything. Nothing has changed quite yet, but knowing that the cornerstone of much of your identity will eventually be taken away from you makes you feel, well, a bit depressed.

After waking up to news that Britain had voted to leave the European Union, it is likely that many Brits felt this way. After all, it was a close race. More than 16 million people voted to remain part of the European Union — a healthy 48 percent of the turnout.

But a dating app created specifically for Brits heartbroken by their country's Brexit decision hopes to bring some cheer. It's called Remainder, a spin on the moniker given to people who wanted to remain in the European Union.

"We thought the best way of recovering must be to go out for a few drinks with someone who's in the same boat," the app's creators said in a statement on their website.

At first the creators started the online dating app as a joke. But when it generated lots of interest, the creators decided to make it real. Thousands of people have signed up, according to local media. The app is still in the development phase but is apparently almost complete.

It is no surprise that disappointed Brits have come up with clever ways to digest the news that they will eventually have to leave the bloc.

The creators of the app are planning exclusive events in "Remain voting cities like London, Brighton, Liverpool, Manchester, Glasgow and Edinburgh." And venues in those locations are talking with the app's creators about hosting a "Remainder date night."

It's probably safe to assume that young people are driving the interest in this app. As my colleague Max Bearak recently noted, an overwhelming majority of young voters in Britain wanted to remain in the European Union. He also noted, though, that they voted in far fewer numbers than older Britons, who were likely to have cast ballots in support of Britain's exit.

Read more: 

What Brexit tells us about the crisis of liberal politics

Mayor Sadiq Khan demands more autonomy for London after Brexit vote 

Young Brits are angry about older people deciding their future, but most didn't vote