President Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive at Brussels Military Airport in Melsbroek, Belgium, on Tuesday, ahead of a NATO summit. (Francois Lenoir/Reuters)

President Trump touched down in Brussels on Tuesday, kicking off a week-long tour of Europe that will take him to four countries. The highlights of this trip are the North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit Thursday and a one-on-one meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday. 

Here's a guide to his full itinerary:

Wednesday: NATO meeting in Brussels

Trump will start the trip in Brussels, where he will attend the NATO summit. Relations between the United States and its North American allies have significantly deteriorated since the last time Trump attended the meeting — and memorably pushed the prime minister of Montenegro aside for a photo opportunity.

While U.S. Ambassador to NATO Kay Bailey Hutchison has said that the plan for this year's summit is to focus on strategies to counter Russia, Trump may spend the day berating member countries on defense spending. The president has doubled down on criticisms of European allies in recent weeks, arguing that NATO members have not been contributing their fair share to the organization's defense budget, calling for every one of the organization's 29 countries to pay at least 2 percent of its gross domestic product toward its military.

NATO leaders are not likely to take Trump's criticisms lying down. On Tuesday, European Council President Donald Tusk delivered a stern warning to the U.S. president: “Dear America, appreciate your allies. After all, you don’t have that many.”

Tensions over trade are also expected to loom in the background. Following an awkward Group of Seven meeting in Quebec last month, Trump abruptly withdrew support from an economic agreement and unleashed a string of attacks against Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, distressing longtime American allies. In recent weeks, various European leaders have also threatened to retaliate against U.S. tariffs and filed complaints to the World Trade Organization.

Thursday: London visit

After Brussels, Trump will head to London, where he will face a citywide “Carnival of Resistance” as well as a giant blimp depicting him as a diaper-wearing infant. In between attending a gala and having tea with Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle, he will meet British Prime Minister Theresa May, who is struggling with chaos in her cabinet following the resignations of her foreign secretary and her top Brexit adviser.

Just moments before flying off, Trump took aim at the already vulnerable May, saying that it is “up to the people” to determine whether she should stay in power. He also complimented Boris Johnson, the former foreign secretary who wrote in a dramatic resignation letter on Monday that the Brexit dream was “dying” under May's leadership.


A helium-filled blimp depicting President Trump as a diaper-wearing infant awaits him in London. (Simon Dawson/Reuters)

Friday-Sunday: Weekend of golf in Scotland

Over the weekend, Trump will take a rest stop at one of the two Trump-owned golf courses in Scotland. There are no official events scheduled for his time here, though U.S. Ambassador to Britain Woody Johnson said the president would “spend some time preparing for Helsinki,” USA Today reported.

Monday: Putin meeting in Helsinki

Trump has met Putin for one-on-one meetings at the sidelines of other summits before, but this is the first time he is formally sitting down with the Russian president for an exclusive meeting. Trump has said the highly anticipated summit may be the “easiest” of his meetings, adding that he “can’t say right now” whether Putin is a friend or foe, describing him instead as a “competitor.”

Across the world, many will be watching Trump's behavior in Helsinki closely to evaluate his approach to Putin, who has repeatedly denied Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election despite evidence from the U.S. intelligence community suggesting otherwise. Intelligence agencies have warned that Russia may attempt to interfere again in the 2018 midterm elections, though it remains to be seen if Trump will raise this as a concern.