The latest Quinnipiac poll reminds us that voters don’t necessarily respond to media hyperventilation. Given the strong partisan divide, new information — even dramatic information such as the completion of the Russia probe — has less impact than one might admit.

The poll, covering a couple days before and a couple days after Attorney General William P. Barr’s controversial letter on the Russia probe was released, tells us:

American voters give President Donald Trump a negative 39 - 55 percent job approval rating, compared to a negative 38 - 55 percent approval rating March 5.
President Trump is mentally stable, 48 percent of voters say, as 44 percent say he is not stable. Voters say 72 - 21 percent that Trump is not a good role model for children.
And voters say 63 - 28 percent that Trump should stop tweeting from his personal account. Republicans say 49 - 39 percent that Trump should keep tweeting, the only listed group that supports this practice.

When it comes to the most important issues, Democrats who haven’t followed Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) are in alignment with voters on health care. Sanders and Republicans seeking to destroy Obamacare are not. “American voters say 55 - 32 percent they would prefer to improve rather than replace the health care system in the U.S. No listed group prefers replacing the health care system,” the poll finds. “Support is 51 - 30 percent for keeping the current health care system while allowing all adults the option of buying into Medicare. Among Republicans, 43 percent support this Medicare buy-in option, with 39 percent opposed.” The latter view has been advanced by a number of Democratic presidential candidates.

AD
AD

Support for Israel remains high, but when it comes to showing more sympathy for Israelis than Palestinians, Israel has lost ground. “Democrats are divided on the Mideast situation as 27 percent say their sympathies lie more with the Israelis and 26 percent say their sympathies lie more with the Palestinians, with 46 percent undecided.” When looked at as a whole, however, “voters sympathize with the Israelis over the Palestinians 47 - 16 percent, with 37 percent undecided. This compares with 54 - 15 percent sympathy for the Israelis over the Palestinians, with 30 percent undecided, in a January 13, 2017 poll.” Finally, on this topic, 24 percent of voters say the U.S. is too supportive of Israel and 14 percent say the U.S. is not supportive enough. You wouldn’t guess so based on the level of acrimony in Congress, but “47 percent say U.S. support for Israel is ‘about right.’ ”

Perhaps Israel and the U.S. Jewish community need to stop personalizing the relationship between Trump, who remains very unpopular, and the Jewish state, which makes the U.S.-Israel relationship under Trump a harder sell. Less time trying to convince voters which party is more pro-Israel and more time educating Americans about Israel’s peace efforts and security threats would be in order.

Finally, voters object to Trump’s shrug on white-nationalist terrorism. (“White supremacist groups pose an immediate threat to the U.S., 42 percent of voters say, as 20 percent say these groups are a threat, but not an immediate one, and 29 percent say these groups are not a threat.”)

AD
AD

And Robert S. Mueller III? We still don’t have his report, but voters overwhelmingly think we should. “Mueller’s report should be made public, American voters say 84 - 9 percent in a Quinnipiac University National Poll released today. Republicans say 75 - 17 percent the report should be made public and every other listed party, gender, education, age and racial group supports making the report public by even wider margins.” Mueller, it seems, has the last laugh despite nearly two years of GOP smears. The poll finds “Mueller conducted a ‘fair’ investigation, 55 percent of voters say, as 26 percent say it was not fair."

In sum, politicians who don’t keep their eyes on the voters’ real concerns and their well-established views of Trump do so at their peril.

Read more:

AD
AD
AD