Several senior White House officials have begun discussing whether to push for a temporary payroll tax cut as a way to arrest an economic slowdown, three people familiar with the discussions said, revealing the growing concerns by President Trump’s top economic aides.
The talks are still in their early stages, and the officials have not decided whether to formally push Congress to approve the cut, these people said, speaking on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to disclose internal discussions. But the White House in recent days has begun searching for proposals that could halt a slowing economy....
Trump and top aides have spent the past few days trying to convince the public that the economy is strong and that fears about a recession are misguided. But White House officials quietly have begun scrambling for new ideas to reverse public concerns and boost business confidence.

It’s so weird that the White House feels a need to come up with concrete new ways to ward off the economic slowdown threat whose very existence Trump claims is being fabricated by his political opponents.

The organization representing the nation’s most powerful chief executives is rewriting how it views the purpose of a corporation, updating its decades-old endorsement of the theory that shareholders’ interests should come above all else.
The new statement, released Monday by the Business Roundtable, suggests balancing the needs of a company’s various constituencies and comes at a time of widening income inequality, rising expectations from the public for corporate behavior and proposals from Democratic lawmakers that aim to revamp or even restructure American capitalism.
“Americans deserve an economy that allows each person to succeed through hard work and creativity and to lead a life of meaning and dignity,” reads the statement from the organization, which is chaired by JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon.

With a possible recession looming, and with at least some of the Democratic presidential candidates campaigning on vows of far-reaching progressive transformation of the economy, this sort of introspection is perhaps in order, though it’s hard to know how real it is.

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* Ron Nehring has a good piece informing Republicans that no amount of attacks on Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez will fix three serious problems the GOP faces in 2020: The lack of a good economic message; the loss of support in suburbia; and demographics.

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As CAP spokesman Jesse Lee put it to us: “Trump thinks his Twitter account is his main weapon for his re-elect. But Democrats have a real opportunity to make it boomerang and reinforce what everybody hates about Trump."

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