The Trump administration will revoke California’s right to set stricter air pollution for cars and light trucks on Wednesday, according to two senior administration officials, as part of a larger effort to weaken an Obama-era climate policy curbing greenhouse gas emissions from the nation’s auto fleet.
The move sets up a legal battle between the federal government and the nation’s most populous state, which for decades has exercised authority to put in place more stringent fuel economy standards. Thirteen states and the District of Columbia have vowed to adopt California’s standards if they diverge from the federal government’s, as have several major automakers.
Last year, the Environmental Protection Agency and Transportation Department proposed taking away the waiver California received under the Obama administration to set tailpipe emissions for cars and light-duty trucks, as part of a rule that would freeze mileage standards for these vehicles at roughly 37 miles per gallon from 2020 to 2026.

I thought the environment was getting a little too clean.

* Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski swaggered a lot to impress the Audience of One during his testimony to the Judiciary Committee today, but Andrew Desiderio and Kyle Cheney report on what really mattered:

Democrats were also hopeful that Lewandowski’s refusal to answer many questions would be seen as evidence of what [Committee chairman Jerrold] Nadler has long emphasized: that obstruction of Congress, too, can be an impeachable offense. ...
Lewandowski largely confirmed the version of events contained in Mueller’s report, at times complying with Democrats’ line of questioning by agreeing with the way Mueller’s report characterized his actions and responses to Trump’s directives.

Lewandowski’s stonewalling -- which was openly cheered by Trump, and came after the White House mounted an absurd argument to limit his testimony -- probably helped build the case for Trump’s impeachment. Whether or not there will ever be a full House vote on articles, of course, is another matter entirely. -- gs

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In less than three years, President Donald Trump has named more former lobbyists to Cabinet-level posts than his most recent predecessors did in eight, putting a substantial amount of oversight in the hands of people with ties to the industries they’re regulating.
The Cabinet choices are another sign that Trump’s populist pledge to “drain the swamp” is a catchy campaign slogan but not a serious attempt to change the way Washington works. Instead of staring down “the unholy alliance of lobbyists and donors and special interests” as Trump recently declared, the influence industry has flourished during his administration.
The amount spent in 2019 on lobbying the U.S. government is on pace to match or exceed last year’s total of $3.4 billion, the most since 2010, according to the political money website Open Secrets. Trump also has pulled in hefty contributions from industries with business before his administration, and his hotel near the White House has been a magnet for lobbyists and foreign interests since he was elected.

This is what the Founders wanted.

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