One thing to keep in mind about impeachment polling: The polls cannot be conducted fast enough to keep up with new incriminating revelations, some straight from President Trump’s lips. On Thursday alone:

  • Trump said on the White House grounds that he wanted help from China and Ukraine in defeating former vice president Joe Biden.
  • CNN reported: “During a phone call with Xi [Jinping] on June 18, Trump raised Biden’s political prospects as well as those of Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who by then had started rising in the polls, according to two people familiar with the discussion. In that call, Trump also told Xi he would remain quiet on Hong Kong protests as trade talks progressed.”
  • CNN also reported: “The former US special envoy for Ukraine told House investigators that he urged Ukraine’s leadership not to interfere in US politics in a conversation that followed the phone call between President Donald Trump and Ukraine’s Volodymyr Zelensky, according to two sources familiar with the testimony.” This confirms another key part of the whistleblower complaint.
  • After a Wall Street Journal report, The Post confirmed: “President Trump ordered the removal of the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine over concerns that she was biased against him and an obstacle in his effort to get Ukrainians to investigate former vice president Joe Biden and his son Hunter.”
  • House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.) released damning texts of conversations between U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland, career diplomat Bill Taylor and U.S. special envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker that explicitly discuss the “deliverable” Trump demanded (announcement of an investigation into the company on which Hunter Biden served on the board) in exchange for aid and a visit.

Even before Americans learned any of that, polling on impeachment showed a national consensus in the making. In a poll by Morning Consult-Politico, a majority favors an impeachment inquiry (51 percent to 42 percent). Quite simply, “Americans are more eager to impeach Trump now than they were at similar points in the impeachment sagas of Bill Clinton and Richard Nixon,” reports Harry Enten of CNN.

Couple those results with new polling from Morning Consult showing Trump is underwater in battleground states of Arizona (his net approval is down 23 points since his presidency began), Colorado (down 16), Florida (down 23), Iowa (down 22), Michigan (down 18), New Hampshire (down 23), North Carolina (down 21), Pennsylvania (down 17) and Wisconsin (down 17), and you see what could amount to an electoral disaster in the making.

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While a significant number of Americans are not in favor of an impeachment ordeal, a huge majority still thinks soliciting help from a foreign country is not appropriate. Does one imagine after seeing all the evidence that the voters will want to give Trump four more years?

Frankly, there is a much higher risk the public would conclude that even if impeachment isn’t the way to go, an already unpopular president certainly cannot be given another term. They might even conclude Republicans who protected him have not earned their ongoing trust.

If you are Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) or Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), your chances of winning reelection are not helped by having an unpopular, impeached (even if acquitted) president at the top of the ticket. Moreover, whichever way they vote in the Senate trial, they are going to alienate a really big chunk of voters. Sure, they despise the notion that they should tell voters what they think now. Nevertheless, they’ll despise even more running on the ballot with Trump, either defending the indefensible or arguing with irrational Republicans.

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Keep an eye on the polling. Republicans surely do, and right now it is telling them that leaving Trump on the ticket makes their political survival difficult, if not impossible.

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