Regarding the May 10 editorial “Straight shooting”:

The firearms industry does not oppose the development or marketing of user-authorized, so-called “smart gun” technology. We oppose government mandates. If an individual wants to purchase such a firearm, that should be his or her choice. However, until law enforcement adopts these guns, trust in the reliability of the associated radio-frequency identification or biometric technology will remain in question.

The firearms industry takes firearm safety extremely seriously, but we must beware the law of unintended consequences. Does anyone think that a left-out, loaded “smart gun,” reliant on batteries and dependent on an accompanying signal bracelet or watch, is safer than a firearm locked in a safe or secured with a gunlock, such as those provided by manufacturers with every new firearm they ship?

The firearms industry’s Project ChildSafe has distributed more than 36 million gun-safety kits, including free gun locks, for more than a decade. We do not minimize the tragedy of any death owing to an accident with a firearm, but we must note that such fatalities have been declining for 20 years and are the lowest since the keeping of such records began a century ago.

Lawrence G. Keane, Newtown, Conn.

The writer is senior vice president and general counsel for the National Shooting Sports Foundation, a trade association for gun manufacturers.