Global Opinions

The year Mexican women shook the country

In a year, and despite the contingency for covid-19, Mexican women have shaken the foundations of the country. The March 8, 2020, International Women’s Day march (8-M) and the “Un día sin nosotras” (“A day without us”) strike the following day became crucial points in the fight against sexist violence. In the next months, their cause advanced in different states of the nation. And 2021′s 8-M, once again, rocked Mexico.

Lizbeth Hernández

8M

Mahé Elipe

Mahé Elipe

8M

Lizbeth Hernández

Lizbeth Hernández

These photos display the main protest actions carried out between 2020 and 2021′s 8-M. It’s a journey that establishes that women’s demands, which are not new, will continue, despite being criminalized or repressed.

Lizbeth Hernández

8M

Mahé Elipe

Mahé Elipe

8M

Lizbeth Hernández

Lizbeth Hernández

8M

Lizbeth Hernández

Lizbeth Hernández

For a few months, the covid-19 pandemic slowed the protests. But the violence crisis gradually forced women to take to the streets again and even take over public buildings such as the National Human Rights Commission and Puebla and Quintana Roo’s local congresses. They also held performances and sit-ins at political party headquarters.

Lizbeth Hernández

8M

Mahé Elipe

Mahé Elipe

8M

Mahé Elipe

Mahé Elipe

8M

Mahe ELIPE

Mahe ELIPE

The anger and actions in memory of the victims of femicide — 939 official cases in 2020 and 2021 — and against sexual violence propelled manifestations in different regions such as Mexico City, Estado de México, Chihuahua, Guanajuato, Guerrero, Puebla and Quintana Roo.

Mahe ELIPE

8M

Lizbeth Hernández

Lizbeth Hernández

8M

Lizbeth Hernández

Lizbeth Hernández

8M

Mahé Elipe

Mahé Elipe

The emergence of women has become the Mexican government’s Achilles’ heel. They represent the main opposition movement against President Andrés Manuel López Obrador.

Mahé Elipe

8M

Mahé Elipe

Mahé Elipe

8M

Lizbeth Hernández

Lizbeth Hernández

After multiple demonstrations and direct actions, the president has said he doesn’t believe that this is “the best way” to protest: “There are many ways to protest peacefully, to raise your voice and even to insult, but not by throwing bombs, using hammers and setting things on fire.” The women point out that these actions result from the desperation and the impunity of the attacks against them.

Lizbeth Hernández

8M

About the authors: Lizbeth Hernández is a freelance journalist, photographer and editor. She has been covering the feminist protests in Mexico since 2011. Mahé Elipe is a French freelance photographer who has been living in Mexico for the past five years. Women’s rights are her work’s primary focus.

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