A Juul vaping system with accessory pods in various flavors. (Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post)

The skyrocketing use of Juuls among teenagers is creating major concerns for parents and schools [“Teen ‘Juuling’ a drag for schools,” Metro, May 11]. Juuls are nicotine products that have cracked the code in appealing to kids: cool names and flavors, devices that are easily concealed from adults and, of course, newly forged nicotine addictions.

Schools are responding by removing bathroom stall doors and installing vapor detectors in bathrooms. Parents are responding by demanding school administrators do more to protect their kids from the dangers of nicotine addiction.

And the Food and Drug Administration is responding by sending a letter to Juul.

The FDA has the authority to regulate these products — but the Trump administration’s FDA has delayed by years taking any action on Juuls and other e-cigarettes. No matter how hard they try, schools and parents can’t regulate this multibillion-dollar industry. The FDA can, but it has only delayed.

Michelle N. Eakin, Ellicott City

The writer is a member of the American Thoracic Society Tobacco Action Committee.