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Opinion A lesson on voting in Virginia

Virginia Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin (R) greets supporters on Nov. 2 in Chantilly.
Virginia Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin (R) greets supporters on Nov. 2 in Chantilly. (Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
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Regarding the Nov. 6 Metro article “Youngkin’s son, 17, tried to vote”:

Let me get this straight: The son of Virginia Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin (R), who is unregistered and too young to vote, nevertheless attempted to do just that. Not once but twice. Rather than being confused, the son seemed to be engaged in an exercise to try to stick it to The Man, or in this case, the woman who politely turned him away.

The Youngkin campaign response? Not to apologize for the son’s youthful indiscretion but to engage in a sneering, hypocritical attack on the officials conducting the election.

Nice start for a governor-elect who made voter integrity a centerpiece of his campaign.

Howard Cincotta, Falls Church

When the son of Virginia Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin (R) went to a voting place in Fairfax County, he was turned away politely and with some information about when he could vote. Instead of seeing this as a positive moment for election integrity and that the election officials were doing their jobs, Youngkin spokesman Devin O’Malley chose to turn it into an opportunity to criticize Democrats.

Why couldn’t he even acknowledge that it showed an example of fair elections, which Republicans claim to want?

Vicki DeFries, Washington

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