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Opinion A path forward on electric cars

A worker cleans off a Foxtron Model C electric car after it was unveiled at a media event in Taipei, Taiwan, on Oct. 18.
A worker cleans off a Foxtron Model C electric car after it was unveiled at a media event in Taipei, Taiwan, on Oct. 18. (Wu Taijing/AP)
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Megan McArdle did a good job explaining the pros and cons concerning the electric vehicle industry as it relates to the common person [“I’m no longer an EV skeptic, but I still didn’t buy one,” op-ed, Oct. 27]. The initial cost will come down as demand increases, but the problem of charging the batteries will remain a roadblock. Besides finding a place to charge the battery, plugging it in results in creating carbon from wherever the electricity is generated. Something is burning somewhere. Taking long road trips will also be a problem.

There is an easy solution: Make three or four standard sizes (depending on size of vehicle) of replaceable, rechargeable batteries. Every “gas station” in the country could be a “battery station.” When the battery alerts the driver that 50 miles of charge is left on the battery, the battery can be exchanged at a station where, in a few minutes the “used charge” can be assessed and paid for, and a new, fully charged battery given. That local battery station could use whatever local green source to recharge the used battery.

This system would elicit virtually no carbon footprint, and taxes on the electricity used could pay for fixing and maintaining the roads and other things the current gasoline tax covers. It’s a win-win for all concerned. 

Burt J. Mazia, Rockville

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