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Opinion Getting plastic away from and out of our food

A volunteer takes part in a beach clean-up in Lamteungoh village, Aceh Besar, Indonesia, on Oct. 28. Plastic garbage frequently washes away from urban areas in Indonesia and ends up in the ocean.
A volunteer takes part in a beach clean-up in Lamteungoh village, Aceh Besar, Indonesia, on Oct. 28. Plastic garbage frequently washes away from urban areas in Indonesia and ends up in the ocean. (Hotli Simanjuntak/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock)
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The Oct. 27 news article “Report: Some fast-food items contain plastics linked to health problems” highlighted consequences brought by our society’s demand for convenience. We have been told the food market demands soft, single-use plastics and that widespread plastics litter is just inevitable.

And corporate America knows this is a problem. After all, companies that cater to the broadest customer base could be affected if people decided throwaway plastic also poses health problems. NextGen Consortium — led by McDonald’s, Starbucks and Coca-Cola — has pledged $10 million to determine whether compostable and reusable packaging can match market and economic demands. Recycling options are also on NextGen’s table. After all, if the public does not like what it sees, it won’t continue to buy.

Of course, compostable food packaging options are already available for interested companies or individuals. (Personally, I purchase food packages made of sugar cane to support fundraisers for my local political party.)

Stuart Price, Amelia, Va.

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