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Opinion This bill is needed to help Maryland address climate change

Members of the Fairfax County Stormwater Management Branch and contractors walk next to a failed dam in the Kingstowne area of Alexandria, Va., on Oct. 5, 2010.
Members of the Fairfax County Stormwater Management Branch and contractors walk next to a failed dam in the Kingstowne area of Alexandria, Va., on Oct. 5, 2010. (Tracy A Woodward/WASHINGTON POST)
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Regarding the April 12 Politics & the Nation article “Rainfall estimates, reality are far apart in many states”:

Our country needs a comprehensive, national precipitation database as climate change brings extreme weather events.

As a Maryland state legislator, I sponsored legislation to bring Maryland’s development and stormwater management regulations into the 21st century.

My climate adaptation bill (H.B. 295/S.B. 227), which is co-sponsored by Sen. Sarah Elfreth (D-Anne Arundel) and passed both chambers last week, will increase Maryland’s community resilience and mitigate flood impacts by using the most recent precipitation data available for stormwater design.

Rainfall measured during heavy precipitation events in the northeastern United States has increased by more than 70 percent in the past few decades, so using old rainfall data just doesn’t work now. We need to use data that reflects today’s climate reality to stop extreme flooding and sewage overflows that devastate our communities.

Gov. Larry Hogan (R) should sign this bill into law. Every state needs infrastructure to perform at the level it is supposed to despite the challenges we are facing from climate change.

 Sara Love, Annapolis

The writer, a Democrat, represents part of Montgomery County in the Maryland House of Delegates.

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