I was surprised that the Nov. 7 editorial concerning the problems with Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s (D-Mass.) Medicare-for-all plan, “Plans that are too good to be true,” did not mention that the wealth tax she relies upon to partially fund her various plans is barred by Article I, Section 9 of the Constitution, as pointed out in George F. Will’s Oct. 24 op-ed, “Warren won’t beat Trump in swing states,” and even if the Democrats gain control of the Senate, it is unlikely her plan would pass the House, let alone gain the 60 votes likely to be needed in the Senate.

David Tillotson, Washington

Regarding the Nov. 7 editorialPlans that are too good to be true”:

AD

We spend more for health care, per capita, than any other industrialized country in the world, by far. There are no effective cost controls on the private health-care sector, and our current law prevents Medicare from exerting any leverage whatsoever over drug prices.

AD

Currently, about one quarter of the total cost of health care is borne by individuals in premiums and deductibles, and more is borne indirectly by employer premiums paid in lieu of higher wages.

Any single-payer plan could exercise leverage on costs and simplify the administrative burden whose cost we all bear. Does it really matter if those costs are paid by taxes or premiums and deductibles?

Please explain what compromises Canada has made among its “various needs” to pay for its wildly popular single-payer system? It seems as if Canada’s roads and schools are as good as ours, with universal coverage to boot.

Ronald Schwartz, Clarksville

AD
AD