Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh testifies before a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on Sept. 27. (Jim Bourg/Reuters)

After reading the Oct. 6 Metro article “Teaching more than ‘no means no,’ ” I better understood why we as a nation find consent such a hard concept to grasp. In light of the hearings related to Brett M. Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court, parents of sons in all-boys prep schools, similar to the one Mr. Kavanaugh attended, were asked, “How can a mother or father prevent their teenage son from someday being accused of sexual assault?”

It has been one year since the #MeToo movement galvanized the nation with the accusations against film producer Harvey Weinstein, and we have yet to address the fact that sexual assault, whether you are accused of it or not, is just wrong. How can you explain to American youths that both people involved in any sexual activity have the right to control what is happening to their bodies when you don’t acknowledge the other person involved in the activity at all?

For rape culture to truly change, we need to start asking the right questions, not “How can a mother or father prevent their teenage son from someday being accused of sexual assault?” but “How does one keep from committing a crime that can ruin another person’s life?”

Oreet Zimand, Silver Spring