Jonathan Capehart

Washington, D.C.

Opinion columnist focusing on the intersection of social and cultural issues and politics

Education: Carleton College, BA in Political Science.

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jonathan Capehart has been a member of The Washington Post editorial board since 2007. He writes about politics and social issues, hosts the podcast “Capehart” (formerly named “Cape Up”) and anchors the weekly Washington Post Live show “First Look,” which is also streamed on “The Choice MSNBC” on Comcast’s Peacock streaming service. Capehart is also an MSNBC contributor and the anchor of “The Sunday Show with Jonathan Capehart.” His MSNBC special “A Promised Land: A Conversation with Barack Obama” was nominated in 2021 for an Emmy for Outstanding News Discussion & Analysis. At PBS, Capehart serves as a commentator on “The PBS NewsHour” and is featured on the popular Friday segment
Latest from Jonathan Capehart

First Look with Marianna Sotomayor, Eugene Robinson and Jennifer Rubin

On Washington Post Live’s “First Look,” associate editor Jonathan Capehart speaks with The Post’s Marianna Sotomayor, Eugene Robinson and Jennifer Rubin about the future leadership of the House, the Georgia Senate runoff and the 2024 presidential election. Conversation recorded on Friday, Dec. 2, 2022.

December 2, 2022

Gee, thanks for this tiny step to protect my same-sex marriage

The more I focus on the details of the Respect for Marriage Act, the more my joy diminishes.

November 29, 2022

Best of: Michael Fanone’s battle for accountability for Jan. 6

In this Washington Post Live conversation from Oct. 18, former D.C. police officer Michael Fanone discusses his new book, “Hold the Line: The Insurrection and One Cop’s Battle for America’s Soul,” recounts his firsthand experience defending the U.S. Capitol and explains why it’s so important to hold insurrectionists accountable for the violence of Jan. 6, 2021.

November 29, 2022

If Sharpton is a ‘Loudmouth,’ Trump is so much worse

A documentary about the civil rights activist presents insight into the former president.

November 25, 2022

Linda Thomas-Greenfield’s journey from the segregated South to the United Nations

In this conversation first recorded at the Global Women’s Summit on Nov. 15, Thomas-Greenfield discusses how her upbringing in the segregated South has affected her work as a diplomat and what it’s like being a Black women in a world dominated by White men.

November 22, 2022

First Look for Nov. 18 with Ashley Parker, Ruth Marcus and Hugh Hewitt

On Washington Post Live’s “First Look,” associate editor Jonathan Capehart speaks with The Post’s Ashley Parker, Ruth Marcus and Hugh Hewitt about Republicans winning the house, the future plans of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Donald Trump’s 2024 presidential run.

November 18, 2022

Matthew F. Delmont on Black Americans fighting for ‘double victory’ in WWII

In this Washington Post Live conversation from Nov. 3, professor Matthew F. Delmont discusses his new book, “Half American: The Epic Story of African Americans Fighting World War II at Home and Abroad,” the important roles Black Americans played in every branch of the military, and the disrespect and violence they faced when returning home.

November 15, 2022

First Look for Nov. 11 with Dan Balz, Charles Lane and Jennifer Rubin

On Washington Post Live’s “First Look,” associate editor Jonathan Capehart speaks with The Post’s Dan Balz, Charles Lane and Jennifer Rubin about the midterm results, the Georgia Senate runoff and why inflation continues to rise despite the Fed raising interest rates.

November 11, 2022

Georgia’s record early vote doesn’t vindicate its ‘Jim Crow 2.0’ law

Just because people make their way around the obstacles to vote doesn’t mean said obstacles are no big deal.

November 9, 2022

Wendell Pierce puts ‘Death of A Salesman’ in a whole new light

In this Washington Post Live conversation from Oct. 24, veteran actor Wendell Pierce discusses his starring role in the latest rendition of Arthur Miller’s “Death of A Salesman,” and how having a Black family at the play’s center shines a whole new light on the classic drama.

November 8, 2022