Paul Kane

Washington, D.C.

Senior congressional correspondent and columnist

Education: University of Delaware, BA

Paul Kane has covered Congress since 2000, when he started at Roll Call with a beat focused on the Senate. He started with The Washington Post in 2007, covering the 2008 financial crisis and the Obama-Republican fiscal wars. He began writing a regular column, @PKCapitol, on Congress and its interactions with the Trump administration in 2017. He's covered Washington's response to the global pandemic, the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, two impeachments and now writes about the Biden administration's legislative agenda on Capitol Hill.
Latest from Paul Kane

Only in N.Y.: Upper West Side’s Nadler vs. Upper East Side’s Maloney

A court-ordered redistricting map has created a cross-town battle that has never happened: One House committee chair, Jerrold Nadler of New York's Upper West Side, is set to face off against Manhattan's other House committee chair, Carolyn B. Maloney of the Upper East Side.

May 21, 2022

GOP voters choose nominees with first loyalty to Trump, not McConnell

In early primaries, Republican voters continue to side with nominees who, should they win, will probably have more loyalty to the former president than Mitch McConnell, creating potential headaches down the road for the long-serving Senate GOP leader.

May 18, 2022

The list of anti-Ukraine Republican lawmakers is quickly growing

In early March, Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) was one of three lawmakers to oppose the first piece of pro-Ukraine legislation. With each proposal, a few more Republicans would sign up. This week 57 Republicans opposed President Biden’s request for $40 billion in weapons and humanitarian aid.

May 14, 2022

As Senate became more polarized, messaging votes lost their power

For the vast majority of Republican senators, voting against abortion rights on Wednesday served as a political win in states that have skewed so conservative that their only fear is of losing a GOP primary.

May 11, 2022

In confirming Supreme Court justices, private meetings trump hearings

The most critical moments for prospective justices often come in the dozens of private huddles they hold with senators.

May 7, 2022

Voters increasingly credit Democrats for pandemic turnaround

President Biden’s approval rating for handling the virus has surged to 51 percent among all adults, his highest rating since last summer and up from 44 percent in February, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll. Yet most voters have turned their attention to other issues, particularly inflation.

May 5, 2022

Biggs says McCarthy’s comments on Trump, Jan. 6 are ‘huge trust issue’

Biggs, a former leader of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, is among the first House Republicans to openly criticize McCarthy over his remarks about Trump and the 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol by a pro-Trump mob.

April 26, 2022

McCarthy’s failure to lead House Republicans started before Jan. 6

The GOP leader, who wants to be speaker, wouldn’t tell his members whether he would vote to certify Biden’s victory.

April 22, 2022

The new dean of the House hopes to make the place ‘a bit more civil’

Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Ky.), first elected in 1980, replaces the late Don Young as the longest tenured House member, claiming the honorific title of "dean" at a time when the unruly chamber sits on a knife's edge amid post-insurrection tension.

April 16, 2022

House GOP leaders lack insight into Jan. 6 committee’s inner workings

Dozens of GOP lawmakers are left in the dark about what evidence the committee has collected involving their own contacts with Trump and his senior advisers in the run up to, and during, the attack on the Capitol.

April 9, 2022