Photographer David Godlis’s book “Godlis Miami” is a riotous romp down memory lane to a place and time long gone.

(David Godlis)

A dog barks at a drone during a Parachute Infantry Brigade graduation ceremony in Rio de Janeiro; a 15-year-old is suspected of opening fire on his classmates, killing four people and injuring seven others, at Oxford High School in Michigan; antiabortion and abortion rights advocates gather in Washington as the Supreme Court hears a Mississippi abortion-law case; and people take photos overlooking the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree lighting in New York. See nine of the week’s most interesting and gripping images from around the world, selected by Washington Post photo editors.

  • Washington Post Staff
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The Washington Post's picks of noteworthy residences on the market.

Police violence against women in Argentina leaves families grieving and women asking who will protect them.

  • Karen Naundorf
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Photographer James Whitlow Delano examines the country’s dwindling geriatric villages.

Stephen Sondheim has died at 91. The songwriter had a hand in enduring musicals, including ‘West Side Story’ and ‘Sweeney Todd.’Sondheim's intricate and impactful lyrics, venturesome melodies and sweeping stage visions made him a central figure in contemporary American musical theater. His primary achievement lies in the works for which he created both music and lyrics, including “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” “Company,” “Follies,” “A Little Night Music,” “Sweeney Todd,” “Sunday in the Park With George,” “Into the Woods” and “Passion.”

  • Washington Post Staff
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Associated Press photographer Bram Janssen takes us into the now shuttered Ariana Cinema, where its employees still come to work, hoping one day the theater will reopen and they can get paid again.

The three men who chased and killed Arbery in coastal Georgia last year were convicted of murder Wednesday, in a case that once went 74 days without arrests and that many saw as a test of racial bias in the justice system.

  • Washington Post Staff
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For two decades, Henry has been acting as a beta tester of the robots that scientist Charlie Kemp and others have been creating.

  • Peter Adams
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Photographer Margaret Albaugh’s project, “The Most Asian Part of Me,” interrogates the effect of racism on her life.

As marching bands played and residents lined the street, a driver in a red SUV sped through a holiday parade in Waukesha, Wis., on Sunday, leaving at least five dead and more than 40 injured, city officials said. Authorities have recovered the vehicle and have taken one person into custody, Waukesha Police Chief Dan Thompson said.

  • Washington Post Staff
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Jurors in the polarizing case found Kyle Rittenhouse, 18, not guilty of homicide, attempted homicide and other charges related to the August 2020 shootings in Kenosha, Wis.

  • Washington Post Staff
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Livestock is rescued from a flooded barn after rainstorms lashed British Columbia, Canada; supporters celebrate in Oklahoma after Julius Jones was granted a stay of execution; President Biden signs the $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill outside the White House; Belarusian migrants attempt to enter Poland at the Bruzgi-Kuznica Bialostocka border crossing. See 10 of the week’s most interesting and gripping images from around the world, selected by Washington Post photo editors.

  • Washington Post Staff
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After months of legislating that exposed intraparty riffs, House Democrats finally felt confident they could pass their roughly $2 trillion social spending priority legislation. But the vote would only come after a record-long speech by the House minority leader.

Some migrants were found near death. Others begged for food or warm clothes.

Edward Grazda's new book, "Asia Calling: A Photographer's Notebook 1980-1997" brings together nearly two decades of photographs he made during his travels there.

A storm system dragged a powerful atmospheric river into the Pacific Northwest on Monday. It brought severe flooding to western Washington and British Columbia, prompting evacuations and hundreds of rescues as streets transformed into rivers and landslides made some routes impassable. The top-tier atmospheric river, rated level 5 out of 5, not only drenched the region but also unleashed high winds that cut power to more than 200,000 customers.

  • Washington Post Staff
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The Washington Post's picks of noteworthy residences on the market.

Photographer Jill Freedman's classic book of gritty New York reportage, "Street Cops," has found new light in this reissue from Setanta Books.

Check out some of the incredible photographs of this exhibit at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.

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