The Washington Post

Poor families in Senegal send their children to schools to study the Koran, but sometimes they are instead forced to beg for eight hours a day, are beaten and even raped.

  • May-Ying Lam
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  • In Sight
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  • 22 hours ago
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A young talibe bound by chains in an isolated area of a daara in the city of Touba on May 27, 2015. In this daara, the youngest talibes are shackled by their ankles to stop them from trying to run away. These children can stay like that for days, weeks, even months until they gain the marabout's trust. Their guardian explains, "When I release them, I give them the freedom to beg like the rest of the Talibes." (Mario Cruz)

U.S. women’s field hockey team finds ideal training home in Pennsylvania farmland.

  • 3 hours ago
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(Katherine Frey / The Washington Post)

Warriors lineup is too much for Catoctin in 9-1 victory

  • 10 hours ago
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(Toni L. Sandys / The Washington Post)

Warriors claim fifth straight state title

  • 11 hours ago
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(Toni L. Sandys / The Washington Post)

Bel Air claims third title in school history

The Republican candidate continues to dominate the presidential contest.

Founder Artie Muller keeps all of the accoutrements in his New Jersey garage.

In Cleveland, Miss., two small schools — one almost all black, one historically white — honor their graduating class. This month, a judge ordered the schools to combine into one.

The former secretary of state visits key states in her quest to become the Democratic nominee for president.

The senator from Vermont is Hillary Clinton’s rival in the contest for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Apparently zebra print is a popular choice this year.

Poor families in Senegal send their children to schools to study the Koran, but sometimes they are instead forced to beg for eight hours a day, are beaten and even raped.

  • May-Ying Lam
  • ·
  • In Sight
  • ·
  • 22 hours ago
  • ·

Protests in Peru and Chile, Jerusalem’s Light Festival, President Obama in Japan and more.

Scientists say political controversy about such work has stalled potentially life-saving studies on how to treat certain diseases.

There’s more to the Galapagos Islands than blue-footed boobies: Travelers are ditching cruise ships and are immersing themselves in island life.

The president arrived in Japan for the Group of Seven summit, where the leaders of the seven advanced economies are meeting for two days. Obama also visited Hiroshima, the Japanese city where the United States dropped an atomic bomb in 1945.

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