In Sight

This new book of photos reminds us of the “delirious conditions of our time.”

We’ve taken a look at a vast amount of work over the years here at In Sight, from the terrors of conflict to poignant personal stories of struggle and triumph. I think it is safe to say that the work we have featured runs a gamut that gives a glimpse of how multifaceted life can be.

Life certainly is not something that can be bound up in a tidy box and presented for view. It is complex. Photography can only do so much to try to describe it. Photographer, and educator, Charles H. Traub’s new book, “Tickety-Boo” (Damiani, 2021) puts aside any attempt to describe a specific thing, like war or the theater of politics.

From “Tickety-Boo,” published by Damiani. (Charles H. Traub)

From “Tickety-Boo,” published by Damiani. (Charles H. Traub)

From “Tickety-Boo,” published by Damiani. (Charles H. Traub)

Traub’s work serves as a response to the ever-evolving complexities of life. If you are looking for concrete answers in this book, you are barking up the wrong tree. It is best to approach it with an open mind and to go with the flow — much like Traub did while making the book.

The book was produced over a period of four years. Traub used a smartphone to record impressions that struck him during the course of everyday life. He makes use of a series of diptychs in the book that, in the end, give one a sense of the bumpiness of life.

From “Tickety-Boo,” published by Damiani. (Charles H. Traub)

From “Tickety-Boo,” published by Damiani. (Charles H. Traub)

From “Tickety-Boo,” published by Damiani. (Charles H. Traub)

The publisher of “Tickety-Boo” describes the experience you will have while flipping through the book:

“A stream of consciousness flows in his response to places, things, and people that catch his eclectic whimsy. His subjects are ambiguous and out of context, yet once organized together within this book, create a kind of pictorial completeness, both soothing and disquieting. The photographs in each spread vividly amplify each other leading the viewer to the next sequence. The mundane becomes animated, and in the end, this is a book about the delirious conditions of our time.”

From “Tickety-Boo,“ published by Damiani. (Charles H. Traub)

From “Tickety-Boo,“ published by Damiani. (Charles H. Traub)

From “Tickety-Boo,“ published by Damiani. (Charles H. Traub)

Traub’s book reminds us that life rambles on and it is there to be experienced every day. But “Tickety-Boo” does not shy away from the fact that it is complicated. According to the publisher, the very title of the book comes from an English expression that loosely translates to, “Everything’s okay, but maybe everything isn’t!”

You can find out more about the book, here.

From "Tickety-Boo," published by Damiani. (Charles H. Traub)

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Credits

Photo editing and production by Kenneth Dickerman