In Sight

These stunning images showcase the earth’s fragile beauty

The issue of climate change has been in the news more and more these days, maybe even more this week as leaders from around the world attended the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, a.k.a. COP26.

Photographer David Doubilet’s new book “Two Worlds: Above and Below the Sea,” a career-spanning retrospective of his decades of extraordinary work, is a vivid reminder of the incredible beauty that climate change may be affecting and that world leaders have gathered to try to address.

Chinstrap and Gentoo Penguins, Danco Island, Antarctica, 2011.

This year’s meeting finally took place after being delayed for a year due to the global coronavirus pandemic.

“Two Worlds: Above and Below the Sea” by David Doubilet.

David Doubilet/Phaidon

David Doubilet/Phaidon

The event is being held in Glasgow, Scotland and features thousands of participants, including many heads of state like President Biden, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron, among many others.

David Doubilet/Phaidon

Father and Son, Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, 2013.

The attendees have gathered to pledge to make changes that would help curtail climate change, which is becoming a more and more urgent problem.

“Two Worlds: Above and Below the Sea” by David Doubilet.

David Doubilet/Phaidon

David Doubilet/Phaidon

As climate change marches on, we are seeing hotter weather and an increasing number of severe storms. It’s no hyperbole to say that our planet’s flora and fauna are suffering.

David Doubilet/Phaidon

Grounded Iceberg, Blanley Bay, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada, 2018.

Doubilet has dedicated his life to documenting marine life. He has contributed to over 75 stories at National Geographic magazine since he joined the organization in 1972.

“Two Worlds: Above and Below the Sea” by David Doubilet.

David Doubilet/Phaidon

David Doubilet/Phaidon

Doubilet has developed a reputation as one of the premier underwater photographers in the world. His new book, “Two Worlds: Above and Below the Sea” (Phaidon, 2021) brings together work spanning his entire career. It features scenes from Papua New Guinea to the Antarctic Ocean.

David Doubilet/Phaidon

Blacktip Reef Sharks, South Pass, Fakarava Atoll, French Polynesia, 2018.

Phaidon, the publisher of “Two Worlds,” notes:

“The ocean covers more than 70 percent of our planet, and yet we rarely glimpse its depths. Doubilet has spent decades working to change that by documenting and revealing the exquisite beauty of the ocean’s depths. His work in and on the water has set the modern standard for underwater photography. …

Two Worlds: Above and Below the Sea by David Doubilet.

David Doubilet/Phaidon

David Doubilet/Phaidon

With these remarkable photographs, Doubilet aims to capture the unique viewpoint at the surface of the water that shows the world above and below in a single frame. His journey reveals rare sea creatures, corals, plant life, and the underwater landscape’s striking hues. These photographs are not only breathtaking — they also highlight important issues about marine conservation and climate change.”

David Doubilet/Phaidon

Chinstrap and Gentoo Penguins, Danco Island, Antarctica, 2011.

In Sight is The Washington Post’s photography blog for visual narrative. This platform showcases compelling and diverse imagery from staff members and freelance photographers, news agencies and archives. If you are interested in submitting a story to In Sight, please complete this form.

Two Worlds: Above and Below the Sea by David Doubilet.

David Doubilet/Phaidon

David Doubilet/Phaidon

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