Photography

The scene following a deadly ice avalanche in the Italian Alps

An ice avalanche in the Italian Alps on Sunday killed at least six people and injured at least eight others, local officials said, as emergency workers combed Marmolada mountain for at least 19 missing hikers.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 3

An avalanche set off by the collapse of the largest glacier on Marmolada mountain in Canazei, the highest in the Dolomites, in the Italian Alps killed at least six people and injured at least eight others.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 3

Among those missing after the avalanche were 11 Italians, four Czech nationals, three Romanians, and one French national, local news agency ANSA said Monday.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 3

A UNESCO World Heritage sign near Marmolada mountain and glacier, where a serac, or pinnacle of ice, collapsed.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 3

A rescue team helps with drones at night by illuminating the site where the ice collapsed.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 3

The slide occurred during an early heat wave that saw temperatures rise to around 50 degrees Fahrenheit on Marmolada in recent days. The rescue corps said the heat was “abnormal,” the Guardian newspaper reported.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 4

Experts have long warned that avalanches are becoming more common as global temperatures rise, saying the warming can destabilize mountain climates and speed the melting of glaciers.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 4

Poor conditions in the Dolomites forced rescuers to halt the search operation.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 4

People look at Marmolada mountain from Canazei after the avalanche.

EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

July 4

The glacier collapse happened near Punta Rocca, a route climbers use to reach the top, said Veneto's regional president, Luca Zaia.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 4

A rescue helicopter flies over the collapsed glacier.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 4

Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, center, visits the base of rescue operations.

Filippo Attili

Filippo Attili

July 4

Marmolada, which rises to about 11,000 feet, is the highest peak in the eastern Dolomites. The mountain is referred to as the “queen of the Dolomites,” an area popular with nature and adventure enthusiasts.

EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

July 4

The Veneto region's President Luca Zaia speaks to the news media in Canazei as rescuers resume the search for survivors.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 4

A rescue team gathers near the foot of Marmolada mountain.

EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

July 4

Helicopter rescuers take part in search operations.

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

Pierre Teyssot/AFP/Getty Images

July 4

A report by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change this year outlined the devastating impact of climate change, including irreversible loss of glaciers by the end of this century. “Mountain regions have always been affected by either too much or too little water,” the report said. “Because of climate change, hazards are changing rapidly and becoming even more unpredictable.”

EPE-EFE/Shutterstock

EPE-EFE/Shutterstock

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Photo editing and production by Stephen Cook