$1,000 a month, no strings attached

$1,000 a month, no strings attached Cover Image
In Jackson, Miss., 20 low-income women are a part of one of the first universal basic income pilot programs in the country, assessing a seemingly simple solution to end poverty: give people money — no strings attached.

About All Told

Engaging stories, important issues, new perspectives. All Told is about people -- about the struggles and triumphs of those living inside some of the biggest issues facing our country, about those whose stories rarely get told, and about what it means to be human in today's world.

In this episode

The program is run by The Magnolia Mother’s Trust and grew out of founder Aisha Nyandaro’s work helping poor mothers rise to the middle class. She says she identified a clear need among those enrolled in welfare programs that come with lots of rules and limitations -- cash.

Cheryl Gray is one of the participants in the program. She’s a single mother who brings in a total of about $12,000 each year. In 2019, she was given $1,000 a month, every month. 

This is the story of Aisha Nyandaro, Cheryl Gray, and what they found over a year of trying this relatively untested approach to addressing poverty.

Reporter: Robert Samuels
Producer: Ariel Plotnick

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About All Told

Engaging stories, important issues, new perspectives. All Told is about people -- about the struggles and triumphs of those living inside some of the biggest issues facing our country, about those whose stories rarely get told, and about what it means to be human in today's world.