Framed
Exactly 230 years ago, during a sweltering summer in Philadelphia, a group of revolutionary Americans holed themselves up in Independence Hall and drafted the U.S. Constitution. "This is the most radical body of democratic deliberation ever assembled," says Jeffrey Rosen, head of the National Constitution Center. And in a testament to their work over nearly four months, the document those 55 men produced still serves as the framework for American democracy.

It has, however, changed multiple times over the centuries since its drafting.

In the premier episode, we go back in time to summer 1787 and examine what made it into the original document and why -- the parts that have endured and those that have been contested ever since the Constitution's signing.

Episode guests include Erica Armstrong Dunbar, a history professor at the University of Delaware and author of "Never Caught"; National Archivist David Ferriero; Julie Miller, a historian with the Library of Congress; and Jeffrey Rosen, chief executive officer of the National Constitution Center.
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Framed
Exactly 230 years ago, during a sweltering summer in Philadelphia, a group of revolutionary Americans holed themselves up in Independence Hall and drafted the U.S. Constitution. "This is the most radical body of democratic deliberation ever assembled," says Jeffrey Rosen, head of the National Constitution Center. And in a testament to their work over nearly four months, the document those 55 men produced still serves as the framework for American democracy.

It has, however, changed multiple times over the centuries since its drafting.

In the premier episode, we go back in time to summer 1787 and examine what made it into the original document and why -- the parts that have endured and those that have been contested ever since the Constitution's signing.

Episode guests include Erica Armstrong Dunbar, a history professor at the University of Delaware and author of "Never Caught"; National Archivist David Ferriero; Julie Miller, a historian with the Library of Congress; and Jeffrey Rosen, chief executive officer of the National Constitution Center.
Previous Episode
Preview The Washington Post's newest podcast, a narrative series about the revolutionary figures who shaped America's story. Subscribe now to get the first episode when it launches July 24.
Thursday, June 29, 2017
Next Episode
In 1879, a case involving Chief Standing Bear came before a Nebraska courtroom and demanded an answer to the question: Are Native Americans considered human beings under the U.S. Constitution?
Monday, August 7, 2017