"Attacks on the concept of objective truth are not new," Lee McIntyre and Jonathan Rauch wrote in an op-ed for The Post last month. But Donald Trump brought us to a turning point.

Since his loss, there are daily reminders that truth continues to be under assault. Trump still insists, falsely, that he won the 2020 election. Americans continue to seem hopelessly divided. 

On this week's episode, Lee, author of "Post-Truth," and Jonathan, a Brookings fellow and author of "The Constitution of Knowledge," join James for a conversation about the raging war on truth.  

Their message is that many Americans still don't recognize that we're engaged in such a war, and that the problem is much deeper than our former president.

They argue that the United States has been systematically targeted for years with epistemic warfare — attacks on the credibility of the mainstream media, academia, government agencies, and other institutions and professionals we rely on to keep us collectively moored to facts.

Much of public dialogue today feels like it's happening between people who are not operating from a shared set of facts. So, how is it even possible to win an argument, or find common ground?

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"Attacks on the concept of objective truth are not new," Lee McIntyre and Jonathan Rauch wrote in an op-ed for The Post last month. But Donald Trump brought us to a turning point.

Since his loss, there are daily reminders that truth continues to be under assault. Trump still insists, falsely, that he won the 2020 election. Americans continue to seem hopelessly divided. 

On this week's episode, Lee, author of "Post-Truth," and Jonathan, a Brookings fellow and author of "The Constitution of Knowledge," join James for a conversation about the raging war on truth.  

Their message is that many Americans still don't recognize that we're engaged in such a war, and that the problem is much deeper than our former president.

They argue that the United States has been systematically targeted for years with epistemic warfare — attacks on the credibility of the mainstream media, academia, government agencies, and other institutions and professionals we rely on to keep us collectively moored to facts.

Much of public dialogue today feels like it's happening between people who are not operating from a shared set of facts. So, how is it even possible to win an argument, or find common ground?

Previous Episode
Marketers love them. Journalists often use them. But do generation labels like "baby boomer" and "millennial" mean anything? Cohen, who researches social identity, says no — and he and other sociologists want the Pew Research Center to stop using them.
Friday, July 9, 2021
Next Episode
Former gymnast Rachael Denhollander, the first woman to publicly accuse Larry Nassar of assault, is now a lawyer and advocate. As the Olympics begin, she reacts to the Justice Department's inspector general report on the many warnings the FBI ignored.
Friday, July 23, 2021