‘A very political process’: Covering the Nixon, Clinton and Trump impeachment inquiries
Chief political correspondent Dan Balz has covered politics since the 1960s. That means he’s tracked two impeachment inquiries in his tenure — into presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton. 

As the country heads into its third impeachment inquiry in half a century, Balz says there’s a long road ahead. “It’s a multi-step process and we’re only at the front-end of it,” Balz says.

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How Kenan Thompson went from child star to indispensable steady hand
“Saturday Night Live’s” Kenan Thompson is hyper-aware of camera positions, timing and the ripple effect his actions have on people trying to do their jobs on set. That serious professionalism, his colleagues tell pop culture writer Elahe Izadi, is the other side to what television audiences see at home — the breeziness of a natural performer who can summon humor everywhere.

It’s a talent that puts him everywhere: as the straight man, the bad guy, the steady anchor in an iffy sketch centered on a newbie. “If you go back and watch some sketches where he’s not supposed to be the one delivering the laughs,” Izadi says, “even in the straight character he’s playing, he’s able to amp everything up.” 

And it’s a commitment that’s helped him become the longest-tenured cast member on a famously challenging show to endure, where comedy icons are molded and tend to leave. 

“I would always represent hard work and dedication and professionalism, and just focus on the fact that the world needs a laugh,” says Thompson, who is entering his 17th season of SNL.

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‘A very political process’: Covering the Nixon, Clinton and Trump impeachment inquiries
Chief political correspondent Dan Balz has covered politics since the 1960s. That means he’s tracked two impeachment inquiries in his tenure — into presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton. 

As the country heads into its third impeachment inquiry in half a century, Balz says there’s a long road ahead. “It’s a multi-step process and we’re only at the front-end of it,” Balz says.

More on this topic:

How Kenan Thompson went from child star to indispensable steady hand
“Saturday Night Live’s” Kenan Thompson is hyper-aware of camera positions, timing and the ripple effect his actions have on people trying to do their jobs on set. That serious professionalism, his colleagues tell pop culture writer Elahe Izadi, is the other side to what television audiences see at home — the breeziness of a natural performer who can summon humor everywhere.

It’s a talent that puts him everywhere: as the straight man, the bad guy, the steady anchor in an iffy sketch centered on a newbie. “If you go back and watch some sketches where he’s not supposed to be the one delivering the laughs,” Izadi says, “even in the straight character he’s playing, he’s able to amp everything up.” 

And it’s a commitment that’s helped him become the longest-tenured cast member on a famously challenging show to endure, where comedy icons are molded and tend to leave. 

“I would always represent hard work and dedication and professionalism, and just focus on the fact that the world needs a laugh,” says Thompson, who is entering his 17th season of SNL.

More on this topic:
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Shane Harris takes us through the newly released whistleblower complaint. Juliet Eilperin on the conflicted attitudes of oil and gas executives toward climate change. And Laura Reiley digs into the religious debates behind plant-based meat and shrimp.
Thursday, September 26, 2019
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Sean Sullivan tracks how Democratic presidential candidates are responding to the impeachment inquiry. Wesley Lowery unpacks the argument for reparations. And Anna Fifield explains how pork prices are overshadowing China’s national day celebrations.
Monday, September 30, 2019