A reckoning for People of Praise
A portrait of Katie Logan, who told police in 2020 that she was molested by her teacher at a People of Praise high school shortly after she graduated in 2001. (Jenn Ackerman for The Washington Post)
Last fall, the Christian group People of Praise garnered national attention after a prominent member, Amy Coney Barrett, was nominated to the Supreme Court. Soon after, former members began a Facebook group called “PoP Survivors.” Investigative journalist Beth Reinhard reports on some of those former members who say they were sexually abused by other members of the group when they were children. 

Schools across the country are trying to persuade parents to send their kids back to in-person learning in the fall. Reporter Hannah Natanson follows an elementary school principal as she goes door-to-door to reassure hesitant families.


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A reckoning for People of Praise
A portrait of Katie Logan, who told police in 2020 that she was molested by her teacher at a People of Praise high school shortly after she graduated in 2001. (Jenn Ackerman for The Washington Post)
Last fall, the Christian group People of Praise garnered national attention after a prominent member, Amy Coney Barrett, was nominated to the Supreme Court. Soon after, former members began a Facebook group called “PoP Survivors.” Investigative journalist Beth Reinhard reports on some of those former members who say they were sexually abused by other members of the group when they were children. 

Schools across the country are trying to persuade parents to send their kids back to in-person learning in the fall. Reporter Hannah Natanson follows an elementary school principal as she goes door-to-door to reassure hesitant families.


If you’re enjoying this podcast and you’d like to support the reporting behind it, please consider a subscription to The Washington Post. A subscription gets you unlimited access to everything we publish, from breaking news to baking tips. It also directly supports this show, and the work of Washington Post journalists around the world who are working to uncover the next big story.

Right now, podcast listeners can get one year of unlimited access to The Post for just $29. That’s less than one dollar a week. 

Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://wapo.st/3zkogmc
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