Post Reports

After mass shootings, Trump condemns white supremacy. Critics say he inspires it.

Mark Berman tracks the mass shootings that happened over the weekend in El Paso and Dayton, Ohio. Plus, Philip Rucker on President Trump’s response to the tragedies. And Andrew Freedman on last month’s record-breaking heat.
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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

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More than 30 dead after weekend’s mass shootings 
Back-to-back mass shootings over the weekend have stunned the country: In El Paso, at least 22 people were killed. And less than 14 hours later in Dayton, Ohio, another gunman killed at least nine people and injured at least 27 others.
 
Despite the horror and increasing frequency of mass shootings, national reporter Mark Berman says, it seems like “people have just sort of accepted that this is just part of life in America.”

“The level of trauma that people bring with them throughout the rest of their lives is almost unimaginable. We actually don’t know how many people at this point in time are affected by what happened in El Paso and Dayton.” 

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Trump responds to mass shootings
In response to the violence, President Trump called for a focus on mental illness and condemnation of bigotry, in remarks delivered from the White House on Monday. 

“Mental illness and hatred pulled the trigger,” he said. “Not guns.”

On Twitter, the president suggested pairing gun legislation with new immigration laws, a priority of his that has failed to move through Congress. He did not elaborate on his earlier call for stronger background checks. 

But while the president renounced white supremacy in his morning statement, some critics pointed out that the alleged shooter in El Paso had used language in his manifesto that mirrored Trump’s divisive rhetoric on race and immigration.
“We’ve had so many of these mass shootings during the Trump presidency, but this time is different,” says White House bureau chief Philip Rucker. He says reporters are beginning to ask, “Did he [Trump] contribute through his words, through his rhetoric, to the carnage that played out in El Paso?”

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July was the warmest recorded month
This July’s temperatures beat those of July 2016 – the previous record holder – by about 0.07 degrees, for the hottest month in recorded history. 

Deputy weather editor Andrew Freedman points to the Earth’s changing climate and says July 2019 “basically just offered a preview of what’s to come.”

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.