Self-inflicted controversies and squandered opportunities
White House officials are touting the summer of 2019 as one of historic achievements for President Trump, offering up a list of more than two dozen accomplishments. 

But as White House bureau chief Philip Rucker learned, many of the president’s advisers and outside allies are bemoaning the summer, and what they consider to be a period of missed opportunity and self-sabotage in the final lull before the 2020 presidential vote. 

“He was not strategic in using this time in trying to build for reelection and trying to broaden his appeal,” Rucker says. “Instead, it seems like everything he did this summer hardened people’s views about him and made him a more polarizing figure.”

More on this topic:

‘What happens to people when they get out?’
Around 30 states have occupational licensing laws that make it difficult for formerly incarcerated people to enter or move up in fast-growing industries such as health care, human services and some mechanical trades.

These include the very jobs they’re trained for in prison and reentry programs. Reporter Tracy Jan spoke with a formerly incarcerated person wondering whether the country is ready to see him back in a middle-class job, as new legislative efforts to loosen licensing restrictions emerge.

“You’re a second-class citizen,” Jan says. “You are not part of mainstream society. And this is like a cross you’re going to bear for the rest of your life.” 

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Why we can expect more-intense hurricanes in the future
The Bahamas felt the full force of Hurricane Dorian’s 185-mph winds and 23-foot storm surge this weekend, its largest island sitting in the eyewall of the Category 4 or 5 storm for more than a day. 

As it slowly makes its way up the East Coast, the deadly storm has those living near water concerned about what future hurricanes may look like, as water temperatures and sea levels rise worldwide. 

“Hurricane Dorian is an example of the type of storm we might expect to see with more frequency as we head into the future,” says climate reporter Jason Samenow. “We’re more likely to see stronger, longer-lasting and more-intense hurricanes.”

More on this topic:
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Self-inflicted controversies and squandered opportunities
White House officials are touting the summer of 2019 as one of historic achievements for President Trump, offering up a list of more than two dozen accomplishments. 

But as White House bureau chief Philip Rucker learned, many of the president’s advisers and outside allies are bemoaning the summer, and what they consider to be a period of missed opportunity and self-sabotage in the final lull before the 2020 presidential vote. 

“He was not strategic in using this time in trying to build for reelection and trying to broaden his appeal,” Rucker says. “Instead, it seems like everything he did this summer hardened people’s views about him and made him a more polarizing figure.”

More on this topic:

‘What happens to people when they get out?’
Around 30 states have occupational licensing laws that make it difficult for formerly incarcerated people to enter or move up in fast-growing industries such as health care, human services and some mechanical trades.

These include the very jobs they’re trained for in prison and reentry programs. Reporter Tracy Jan spoke with a formerly incarcerated person wondering whether the country is ready to see him back in a middle-class job, as new legislative efforts to loosen licensing restrictions emerge.

“You’re a second-class citizen,” Jan says. “You are not part of mainstream society. And this is like a cross you’re going to bear for the rest of your life.” 

More on this topic:

Why we can expect more-intense hurricanes in the future
The Bahamas felt the full force of Hurricane Dorian’s 185-mph winds and 23-foot storm surge this weekend, its largest island sitting in the eyewall of the Category 4 or 5 storm for more than a day. 

As it slowly makes its way up the East Coast, the deadly storm has those living near water concerned about what future hurricanes may look like, as water temperatures and sea levels rise worldwide. 

“Hurricane Dorian is an example of the type of storm we might expect to see with more frequency as we head into the future,” says climate reporter Jason Samenow. “We’re more likely to see stronger, longer-lasting and more-intense hurricanes.”

More on this topic:
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Post reporter Sadie Dingfelder used to think she was just really bad at recognizing people. Then she learned she might have a condition called prosopagnosia — better known as face blindness — and set about getting an official diagnosis.
Monday, September 2, 2019
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Taylor Telford on Walmart’s response to multiple mass shootings. Lisa Rein looks at oversight failures in the Department of Veterans Affairs. And Jessica Contrera reports from what might be the most dramatic dog park in the country.
Wednesday, September 4, 2019