AI in the job market and the health-care system
An artificial-intelligence hiring system has become a powerful gatekeeper for some of the country’s most prominent employers, reshaping how companies assess their workforce — and how prospective employees prove their worth.

Designed by the recruiting-technology company HireVue, the system uses candidates’ computer or cellphone cameras to analyze their facial movements, word choice and speaking voice before ranking them among other applicants based on an automatically generated “employability” score.

Tech reporter Drew Harwell says there are a lot of questions about whether this system could give companies that use it a “license to discriminate.” With those questions left unanswered, big companies such as Hilton and Goldman Sachs are already using the program.

Bias in algorithms is not just a concern in hiring. As health and science reporter Carolyn Y. Johnson reports, an algorithm used to rank which patients deserve more medical care has been found to perpetuate racial biases in medicine that already disadvantage black patients.

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Education Department gave millions in student loans to ineligible colleges 
Under the Trump administration, the Education Department approved nearly $11 million in the form of grants and loans to colleges that are ineligible for such aid, according to documents released Tuesday. 

The colleges — the Illinois Institute of Art and the Art Institute of Colorado — were classified as for-profit, non-accredited colleges at the time they were granted the federal money, despite authorities’ knowledge that they did not qualify. At the time, senior education officials wrote to the owner of the colleges, Dream Center Education Holdings, saying they would retroactively designate the colleges as nonprofits. 

Reporter Danielle Douglas-Gabriel says the documents show the latest development in an investigation of Dream Center’s practices, what role the Education Department played in the handling of those funds and how the department interacts with for-profit institutions.

“Certainly, the department does not support the idea of schools preying upon students,” Douglas-Gabriel says. “But some of its actions makes it seem that there is support for these for-profit schools.”

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In Lebanon, frustration with a decades-old government finally boils over 
Massive protests erupted across Lebanon last week, triggered by the government’s plan to impose a tax on the messaging app WhatsApp and fueled by an economic crisis in the small Mediterranean country that has led to gasoline stoppages and ATM outages. 

Beirut correspondent Sarah Dadouch says the demonstrators are angry at the government's decision to increase taxes, instead of clamping down on rampant clientelism and corruption in state institutions.

More on this topic:
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AI in the job market and the health-care system
An artificial-intelligence hiring system has become a powerful gatekeeper for some of the country’s most prominent employers, reshaping how companies assess their workforce — and how prospective employees prove their worth.

Designed by the recruiting-technology company HireVue, the system uses candidates’ computer or cellphone cameras to analyze their facial movements, word choice and speaking voice before ranking them among other applicants based on an automatically generated “employability” score.

Tech reporter Drew Harwell says there are a lot of questions about whether this system could give companies that use it a “license to discriminate.” With those questions left unanswered, big companies such as Hilton and Goldman Sachs are already using the program.

Bias in algorithms is not just a concern in hiring. As health and science reporter Carolyn Y. Johnson reports, an algorithm used to rank which patients deserve more medical care has been found to perpetuate racial biases in medicine that already disadvantage black patients.

More on this topic:

Education Department gave millions in student loans to ineligible colleges 
Under the Trump administration, the Education Department approved nearly $11 million in the form of grants and loans to colleges that are ineligible for such aid, according to documents released Tuesday. 

The colleges — the Illinois Institute of Art and the Art Institute of Colorado — were classified as for-profit, non-accredited colleges at the time they were granted the federal money, despite authorities’ knowledge that they did not qualify. At the time, senior education officials wrote to the owner of the colleges, Dream Center Education Holdings, saying they would retroactively designate the colleges as nonprofits. 

Reporter Danielle Douglas-Gabriel says the documents show the latest development in an investigation of Dream Center’s practices, what role the Education Department played in the handling of those funds and how the department interacts with for-profit institutions.

“Certainly, the department does not support the idea of schools preying upon students,” Douglas-Gabriel says. “But some of its actions makes it seem that there is support for these for-profit schools.”

More on this topic:

In Lebanon, frustration with a decades-old government finally boils over 
Massive protests erupted across Lebanon last week, triggered by the government’s plan to impose a tax on the messaging app WhatsApp and fueled by an economic crisis in the small Mediterranean country that has led to gasoline stoppages and ATM outages. 

Beirut correspondent Sarah Dadouch says the demonstrators are angry at the government's decision to increase taxes, instead of clamping down on rampant clientelism and corruption in state institutions.

More on this topic:
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