A turning point in the Syrian-Kurd conflict, and U.S. policy
Just over a week ago, President Trump announced the removal of troops in northern Syria. That announcement has sparked a chain of events along the Syria-Turkey border, in what appears to be the quick unraveling of longstanding U.S. policy. 

Missy Ryan, who covers the Pentagon and national security for The Post, says Kurds in Syria believe “America has abandoned them and left them to their fate against this much better-armed Turkish military.”

The withdrawal of U.S. forces in northern Syria has upended long-standing U.S. policy, Ryan says. And the effect of that decision is having a rippling effect within the Trump administration and with Turkey. 

More on this topic:

How Trump’s 2020 campaign is creating a new political consulting class
Donald Trump’s lean presidential campaign — with its few political consultants and its shoestring budget — was a point of pride in 2016 for the businessman-turned-candidate, who promised to “drain the swamp” of longtime Washington insiders and pollsters. 

But the president’s reelection campaign for the 2020 election looks nothing like before. Trump’s campaign and supporting committees have spent nearly half a billion dollars, with a large chunk going to the new class of political consultants who rode Trump’s coattails to Washington.

“He has spent more money than any of [his] predecessors had at this point in the campaign,” says reporter Michelle Ye Hee Lee. “And that’s because President Trump’s campaign never ended.”

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Power is back on in California, but questions remain about the intentional blackout
Last week, a million people were without power in Northern California. The utility company Pacific Gas and Electric shut off power to lessen the risk of wildfires amid predictions of dry, heavy winds, which can knock down power lines and spark a fire. 

“It felt a lot to people like it was a political act by Pacific Gas and Electric,” says senior national correspondent Scott WIlson. PG&E is now in bankruptcy after being held responsible for last year’s Camp fire, and the utility company is pushing for California to change the laws. “It felt a little bit like a public negotiation taking place to people who were losing business and schools that were canceled and a lot of small and large inconveniences that rippled across the region last week.”

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A turning point in the Syrian-Kurd conflict, and U.S. policy
Just over a week ago, President Trump announced the removal of troops in northern Syria. That announcement has sparked a chain of events along the Syria-Turkey border, in what appears to be the quick unraveling of longstanding U.S. policy. 

Missy Ryan, who covers the Pentagon and national security for The Post, says Kurds in Syria believe “America has abandoned them and left them to their fate against this much better-armed Turkish military.”

The withdrawal of U.S. forces in northern Syria has upended long-standing U.S. policy, Ryan says. And the effect of that decision is having a rippling effect within the Trump administration and with Turkey. 

More on this topic:

How Trump’s 2020 campaign is creating a new political consulting class
Donald Trump’s lean presidential campaign — with its few political consultants and its shoestring budget — was a point of pride in 2016 for the businessman-turned-candidate, who promised to “drain the swamp” of longtime Washington insiders and pollsters. 

But the president’s reelection campaign for the 2020 election looks nothing like before. Trump’s campaign and supporting committees have spent nearly half a billion dollars, with a large chunk going to the new class of political consultants who rode Trump’s coattails to Washington.

“He has spent more money than any of [his] predecessors had at this point in the campaign,” says reporter Michelle Ye Hee Lee. “And that’s because President Trump’s campaign never ended.”

More on this topic:

Power is back on in California, but questions remain about the intentional blackout
Last week, a million people were without power in Northern California. The utility company Pacific Gas and Electric shut off power to lessen the risk of wildfires amid predictions of dry, heavy winds, which can knock down power lines and spark a fire. 

“It felt a lot to people like it was a political act by Pacific Gas and Electric,” says senior national correspondent Scott WIlson. PG&E is now in bankruptcy after being held responsible for last year’s Camp fire, and the utility company is pushing for California to change the laws. “It felt a little bit like a public negotiation taking place to people who were losing business and schools that were canceled and a lot of small and large inconveniences that rippled across the region last week.”

More on this topic:
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Laura Meckler goes back to her hometown of Shaker Heights, Ohio, to try to understand why integration efforts in schools there are still not closing the achievement gap. And Steve Mufson reports on Jane Fonda’s plan to protest inaction on climate change.
Friday, October 11, 2019
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Douglas MacMillan explains how colleges track potential students before they even apply. Alex Andrejev follows a video-game designer’s path from refugee to CEO. And Louisa Loveluck on the young people who feel locked out of Iraq’s political system.
Tuesday, October 15, 2019