Post Reports

Australia burning

Kate Shuttleworth and Sarah Kaplan on the wildfires ravaging Australia. Colby Itkowitz breaks down how President Trump has reshaped the most important courts in the country. And Jennifer Hassan gives context to Britain’s “Megxit.”
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Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

In this episode

What Australia’s wildfires tell us about climate change
Massive wildfires in Australia this week have taken the lives of dozens of people, killed untold numbers of koalas and other animals, destroyed more than a thousand structures and forced the evacuation of tens of thousands of people. 

“These fires are the size of whole countries,” journalist Kate Shuttleworth reports from southeastern Australia. “That’s nearly 110,000 square miles of land which have been decimated by fire.”

They’ve choked cities with smoke, and rendered the famed Sydney Opera House nearly invisible at the city’s harbor. And it’s not known when or how they’ll end.

“These fires definitely carry the unmistakable fingerprints of climate change,” science reporter Sarah Kaplan says. “The conditions that led to them, and the behavior they’ve exhibited, are all exactly the kinds of things scientists say we should be expecting more of.”

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President Trump’s lasting impact on the courts
In his three years as president, Donald Trump has managed to remake the federal judiciary, ensuring a conservative tilt for decades and cementing his legacy no matter the outcome of the next election.

“Trump has appointed 50 judges to circuit court benches in three years,” and more than 130 judges to other federal courts, politics reporter Colby Itkowitz says. “President Obama appointed 55 [circuit judges] in his entire eight years.”

That means Trump nominees, ushered through by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), make up 1 in 4 U.S. circuit court judges––often the last stop before cases go to the Supreme Court. 

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Royal couple steps back to spend less time with family
Since Wednesday, one story has dominated newspaper’s front pages in Britain: Megxit, or Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s decision to step back from royal family duties. 

“It has blindsided the palace,” foreign reporter Jennifer Hassan says. “There are now a lot of questions around how exactly will they split that time.”

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.