Post Reports

Bringing agency to the black man at the heart of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’

Amber Phillips dissects the first Democratic primary debates. Actor Gbenga Akinnagbe on the toll of playing Tom Robinson in Broadway’s “To Kill a Mockingbird.” And Joy Harjo on her role as the first Native American poet laureate of the U.S.
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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

‘Leapfrogging’ to the left in the Democratic debates 
The Democratic Party is at a crossroads — on health care, on race and on how to attack President Trump. The first Democratic primary debates this week only reinforced that. 

Amber Phillips parses the party’s fault lines in the chaotic 20-candidate debates — and what they mean for how the Democratic nominee could fare in the general election.

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There’s much more to this production of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’
Gbenga Akinnagbe, who plays Tom Robinson in Aaron Sorkin’s Broadway adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” discusses how his new role informs the way he sees race off the stage. 

“It was important from day one that Tom Robinson had some more agency” than in Harper Lee’s novel, Akinnagbe tells Post Reports’ Martine Powers. 

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The new poet laureate, in her own words 
Joy Harjo is the new United States poet laureate. She’s also a member of the Muscogee Creek Nation. This makes her the first Native American poet to hold the position. 

“We tend to be invisible in this country,” Harjo said, “even though we’re right next to you.”

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.