What Boris Johnson spells for Brexit
Britain’s Conservative Party has overwhelmingly selected Boris Johnson to become the country’s next prime minister, replacing – on a vote of merely 0.25 percent of Brits – the pragmatic Theresa May with an incendiary populist, former journalist and avid cyclist. 

May triggered the election two months ago by resigning, after her government repeatedly failed to deliver a Brexit compromise with the European Union that could also withstand parliamentary opposition. Her successor has just three months to broker a more palatable exit plan, having promised his supporters an executable Brexit deal by Oct. 31. 

London bureau chief William Booth says Johnson’s irreverence could alienate members of his own party. The majority of lawmakers in Parliament are opposed to a no-deal Brexit, signaling a showdown to come. 

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Drug companies create a ‘public nuisance,’ alleges nation’s largest-ever civil trial
Last week’s revelation that drug companies saturated the United States with 76 billion pain pills over a period of seven years showed that no corner of the country escaped the drug crisis – especially not Ohio’s Cuyahoga County.

It and nearby Summit County will soon be at the center of the most important legal test of how much responsibility drug companies bear for the opioid epidemic. Barring a settlement, the two counties are scheduled to go to trial in October as the first case among the consolidated lawsuits brought by about 2,000 cities, counties, Native American tribes and other plaintiffs against the companies. 

As investigative reporter Aaron Davis explains, the class-action suit accuses the companies of breaking laws originally designed to combat organized crime. 

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How not to talk about food
Clean eating. Guilty pleasures. Cheat day. These phrases often fuel diet culture, a destructive way of thinking that equates weight loss with health and moral virtue. 

“When we use certain words on a regular basis, it starts to shape the way we think,” says nutritionist and food blogger Ellie Krieger. “What you choose to eat is not a moral judgement.”

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What Boris Johnson spells for Brexit
Britain’s Conservative Party has overwhelmingly selected Boris Johnson to become the country’s next prime minister, replacing – on a vote of merely 0.25 percent of Brits – the pragmatic Theresa May with an incendiary populist, former journalist and avid cyclist. 

May triggered the election two months ago by resigning, after her government repeatedly failed to deliver a Brexit compromise with the European Union that could also withstand parliamentary opposition. Her successor has just three months to broker a more palatable exit plan, having promised his supporters an executable Brexit deal by Oct. 31. 

London bureau chief William Booth says Johnson’s irreverence could alienate members of his own party. The majority of lawmakers in Parliament are opposed to a no-deal Brexit, signaling a showdown to come. 

More on this topic:

Drug companies create a ‘public nuisance,’ alleges nation’s largest-ever civil trial
Last week’s revelation that drug companies saturated the United States with 76 billion pain pills over a period of seven years showed that no corner of the country escaped the drug crisis – especially not Ohio’s Cuyahoga County.

It and nearby Summit County will soon be at the center of the most important legal test of how much responsibility drug companies bear for the opioid epidemic. Barring a settlement, the two counties are scheduled to go to trial in October as the first case among the consolidated lawsuits brought by about 2,000 cities, counties, Native American tribes and other plaintiffs against the companies. 

As investigative reporter Aaron Davis explains, the class-action suit accuses the companies of breaking laws originally designed to combat organized crime. 

More on this topic:

How not to talk about food
Clean eating. Guilty pleasures. Cheat day. These phrases often fuel diet culture, a destructive way of thinking that equates weight loss with health and moral virtue. 

“When we use certain words on a regular basis, it starts to shape the way we think,” says nutritionist and food blogger Ellie Krieger. “What you choose to eat is not a moral judgement.”

More on this topic:
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