Guarding the 2020 Census
In the wake of Russian interference in the 2016 election, U.S. officials are working to protect the 2020 Census against hacking and disinformation campaigns as it plans to count approximately 330 million people. For the first time, the census will be conducted largely online.

The Washington Post’s Tara Bahrampour has been covering the 2020 Census and is examining how going digital could affect the count.

More on this topic:

How Trump appointees stopped a safety recall on crash-prone strollers
After years of spontaneous failure and hundreds of consumer-submitted complaints, the Consumer Product Safety Commission decided that the popular BOB jogging stroller made by Britax needed to be recalled.

After Britax refused to voluntarily recall its strollers, the CPSC sued. Britax kept fighting — until a leadership change brought Republican-dominated oversight the agency. Shortly after, the case ended.

Documents obtained by The Post’s Todd C. Frankel suggest that Britax had a hand in making its regulatory case go away.
More on this topic:

A clash between law and tradition
Southern India's annual cockfights are noisy, gory, big-money affairs. They're also completely illegal.

More on this topic:
Add to a podcast app
Guarding the 2020 Census
In the wake of Russian interference in the 2016 election, U.S. officials are working to protect the 2020 Census against hacking and disinformation campaigns as it plans to count approximately 330 million people. For the first time, the census will be conducted largely online.

The Washington Post’s Tara Bahrampour has been covering the 2020 Census and is examining how going digital could affect the count.

More on this topic:

How Trump appointees stopped a safety recall on crash-prone strollers
After years of spontaneous failure and hundreds of consumer-submitted complaints, the Consumer Product Safety Commission decided that the popular BOB jogging stroller made by Britax needed to be recalled.

After Britax refused to voluntarily recall its strollers, the CPSC sued. Britax kept fighting — until a leadership change brought Republican-dominated oversight the agency. Shortly after, the case ended.

Documents obtained by The Post’s Todd C. Frankel suggest that Britax had a hand in making its regulatory case go away.
More on this topic:

A clash between law and tradition
Southern India's annual cockfights are noisy, gory, big-money affairs. They're also completely illegal.

More on this topic:
Previous Episode
Robert Barnes on the Supreme Court’s differing decisions on religious rights. Patricia Sullivan on how Amazon’s new headquarters in Virginia could threaten a nearby Latino neighborhood. Plus, Canada persuades foreign tech talent to move from the U.S.
Tuesday, April 2, 2019
Next Episode
Rosalind S. Helderman on the people upset about what was left out of the Mueller report summary. David Ignatius on Jamal Khashoggi’s killing six months later. Plus, Jonathan Capehart on voices from the civil rights movement.
Thursday, April 4, 2019