Post Reports

Democrats set the stage (literally) for 2020

The Democratic National Committee struggles to find a big-enough stage for likely presidential candidates. Plus, the second and final installment of our series “An Affair. The Mob. A Murder.”
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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

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Setting the stage (literally) for 2020’s Democratic primaries
The Democratic Party is expecting an unusually large number of candidates vying for the presidential nomination this election, and in preparation the Democratic National Committee is planning to change the debate stage to accommodate what could be more than 20 hopefuls.

Post political reporter Michael Scherer explains that the DNC is finalizing plans to mix high-profile and lesser-known candidates together. Democratizing the debate stage early on, he says, effectively shapes the playing field for the most wide-open Democratic nomination fight in decades:

“If you're a lesser-known candidate with no name ID who doesn't have a national presence, debates are incredibly important because it's really the only way you can put yourself in front of the country.”

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Prime Suspect, Part 2: An Affair. The Mob. A Murder.
In 1986, a woman’s body was found in the trunk of her car. She had been shot in the head and wrapped in an afghan from her couch. Washington Post reporter Mary Jordan was in her mid-20s at the time and covered the grisly murder.
Decades later, the victim’s family reached out to Jordan. The case had never been solved, and while investigators moved on, the family had not.

Jordan had become a veteran Post reporter, covering national politics and spending years overseas as a correspondent in Mexico, England and Japan.

So when her office phone rang on a September morning in autumn 2015, it seemed sheer luck that she was in Washington at the time, let alone at her desk. The family of the slain woman had new information they wanted to share.
“It was fairly irresistible,” Jordan says. “And I also did think that, wow, the chances that I'm still at the paper all these years later and sitting at my desk when the phone rings. It's kind of meant to be.”

This is the final installment of a two-part series. You can hear the first part in Monday’s episode.

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Spacecraft Meets Asteroid: A Love Story
For the past two years, the SUV-size spacecraft OSIRIS-REx, has sailed across the solar system, guided by the light of the stars. It was heading for Bennu, an asteroid the size of the Empire State Building 75 million miles away. This bit of debris has been around for billions of years and could hold secrets about where we came from -- and what we’re made of.

But this is also a love story, a “slow burn” romance, as science reporter Sarah Kaplan explains. OSIRIS-REx and Bennu will spend the next two years in a sort of dance together before the spacecraft reaches out to collect a tiny sample -- with a “kiss” -- and bring it back to Earth.

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.