Domestic terrorism brings calls for new strategy
In the aftermath of attacks that left dozens dead or wounded in Texas and Ohio this weekend, former high-ranking counterterrorism officials have called for a realignment of national security priorities, as violence from white supremacists escalates. 

The United States continues to employ a staggering arsenal of force and intelligence to contain Islamist terrorism, as it has since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. No comparable array of national power has been directed against the new threat emerging from home, says national security reporter Greg Miller, despite its lethality. 

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Recovering after the Camp Fire
Tens of thousands of people were left without homes after the Camp Fire ravaged Paradise, Calif., in 2018. The wildfire was the deadliest in state history, charring an area the size of Chicago.

Now, as the community begins to rebuild, some of its residents are worried that plans to upgrade housing and utilities will alter the town’s character, making it unaffordable for many locals. 

“It’s so competitive for all the families looking to stay,” says video journalist Whitney Leaming. Leaming and her colleague Alice Li profiled Holly Ratliffe, who struggled to stay in Paradise after the Camp Fire. “It was retirees, it was a lot of people living on disability and low-income families,” Leaming says. “They really don’t have the same safeguards set up for homeowners when they lose their homes in these natural disasters.” 

But Ratliffe’s situation is one that we may be seeing more of, says Frances Stead Sellers a writer on the national desk of The Washington Post. “Certainly there is a whole field looking at so-called ‘climate refugees,’ people who were displaced by extremes of weather.” 

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The pleasure of watching gender-reveal parties go wrong
In the United States, expectant parents have jumped out of planes, painted the sky with crop dusters and allowed their cars to undergo extreme damage, just to reveal their future child’s gender.

Reporter Monica Hesse has seen a lot of disasters accompany these gender-reveal events. “It’s sort of the best illustration of that slogan, ‘Man makes plans and God laughs,’ ” she says. “It's sort of really symbolic for the parenting journey that they're about to embark on.” 

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Domestic terrorism brings calls for new strategy
In the aftermath of attacks that left dozens dead or wounded in Texas and Ohio this weekend, former high-ranking counterterrorism officials have called for a realignment of national security priorities, as violence from white supremacists escalates. 

The United States continues to employ a staggering arsenal of force and intelligence to contain Islamist terrorism, as it has since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. No comparable array of national power has been directed against the new threat emerging from home, says national security reporter Greg Miller, despite its lethality. 

More on this topic:

Recovering after the Camp Fire
Tens of thousands of people were left without homes after the Camp Fire ravaged Paradise, Calif., in 2018. The wildfire was the deadliest in state history, charring an area the size of Chicago.

Now, as the community begins to rebuild, some of its residents are worried that plans to upgrade housing and utilities will alter the town’s character, making it unaffordable for many locals. 

“It’s so competitive for all the families looking to stay,” says video journalist Whitney Leaming. Leaming and her colleague Alice Li profiled Holly Ratliffe, who struggled to stay in Paradise after the Camp Fire. “It was retirees, it was a lot of people living on disability and low-income families,” Leaming says. “They really don’t have the same safeguards set up for homeowners when they lose their homes in these natural disasters.” 

But Ratliffe’s situation is one that we may be seeing more of, says Frances Stead Sellers a writer on the national desk of The Washington Post. “Certainly there is a whole field looking at so-called ‘climate refugees,’ people who were displaced by extremes of weather.” 

More on this topic:

The pleasure of watching gender-reveal parties go wrong
In the United States, expectant parents have jumped out of planes, painted the sky with crop dusters and allowed their cars to undergo extreme damage, just to reveal their future child’s gender.

Reporter Monica Hesse has seen a lot of disasters accompany these gender-reveal events. “It’s sort of the best illustration of that slogan, ‘Man makes plans and God laughs,’ ” she says. “It's sort of really symbolic for the parenting journey that they're about to embark on.” 

More on this topic:
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Annie Gowen explains how the trade war is impacting American farmers. Joy Sharon Yi on one woman’s unseen losses after the Charleston, S.C., shooting. And Drew Harwell on the shutdown of a site that’s become a refuge for racists and extremists.
Wednesday, August 7, 2019
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Friday, August 9, 2019