GM workers laid off in America’s ‘pockets of pain’
Last November, General Motors announced it would cut 15 percent of its workers and shut down five plants in North America — including one in Lordstown, Ohio.

“I wouldn’t say this is 100 percent a company town, but let’s say it’s 80 percent,” business reporter Heather Long says. She explains that, counterintuitively, the improving economy has hurt manufacturing for budget-friendly cars like the Chevy Cruze, which were popular during the recession.

When manufacturing layoffs occur, lots of people say, why don’t workers just retrain

“Well, that’s real easy until you’re 45 or 55 and you haven’t been to a classroom in years,” Long says. “Suddenly, you have to go back to school.”

Long went to Lordstown to report on the GM layoffs and what “retraining” actually means for workers.

More on this topic:

Why terrorists are rarely charged with terrorism
Last month, U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant and self-described white nationalist Christopher P. Hasson was arrested. Federal investigators uncovered a massive stockpile of weapons in his home. He was allegedly planning a massive terrorist attack inspired by a mass murderer in Norway.

And yet, he was charged with gun and drug charges, not terrorism charges.

Devlin Barrett has been reporting on the way the federal government uses terrorism charges and why suspected “terrorists” are often charged with lesser crimes.

More on this topic:

The Evolution of Captain Marvel: From love interest, to superhero in her own right.
This weekend, the first female-led superhero movie from Marvel hits theaters with Brie Larson as Captain Marvel — also known as Carol Danvers.

Shelly Tan says, Carol Danvers’s evolution from love interest to the most powerful Avenger mirrors the ups and downs many female superheroes have experienced.

More on this topic:
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GM workers laid off in America’s ‘pockets of pain’
Last November, General Motors announced it would cut 15 percent of its workers and shut down five plants in North America — including one in Lordstown, Ohio.

“I wouldn’t say this is 100 percent a company town, but let’s say it’s 80 percent,” business reporter Heather Long says. She explains that, counterintuitively, the improving economy has hurt manufacturing for budget-friendly cars like the Chevy Cruze, which were popular during the recession.

When manufacturing layoffs occur, lots of people say, why don’t workers just retrain

“Well, that’s real easy until you’re 45 or 55 and you haven’t been to a classroom in years,” Long says. “Suddenly, you have to go back to school.”

Long went to Lordstown to report on the GM layoffs and what “retraining” actually means for workers.

More on this topic:

Why terrorists are rarely charged with terrorism
Last month, U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant and self-described white nationalist Christopher P. Hasson was arrested. Federal investigators uncovered a massive stockpile of weapons in his home. He was allegedly planning a massive terrorist attack inspired by a mass murderer in Norway.

And yet, he was charged with gun and drug charges, not terrorism charges.

Devlin Barrett has been reporting on the way the federal government uses terrorism charges and why suspected “terrorists” are often charged with lesser crimes.

More on this topic:

The Evolution of Captain Marvel: From love interest, to superhero in her own right.
This weekend, the first female-led superhero movie from Marvel hits theaters with Brie Larson as Captain Marvel — also known as Carol Danvers.

Shelly Tan says, Carol Danvers’s evolution from love interest to the most powerful Avenger mirrors the ups and downs many female superheroes have experienced.

More on this topic:
Previous Episode
Matt Viser on what we can learn from an interview with Joe Biden from the 1970s. Cat Zakrzewski on Facebook’s privacy overhaul. Plus, Lavanya Ramanathan on the rebranding of veganism.
Thursday, March 7, 2019
Next Episode
Brian Fung explains Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s push to crack down on tech companies. Aaron Gregg delves into the tragic crash of a commercial Boeing plane in Ethiopia. And Simon Denyer revisits Fukushima, the site of one of Japan’s worst nuclear disasters.
Monday, March 11, 2019