Post Reports

Goodbye Biarritz, Hello … Trump National Doral? Trump makes a pitch for next year’s G-7

David Fahrenthold explains President Trump’s unusual pitch for next year’s G-7 summit: hosting it at his own resort. Sari Horwitz on how fentanyl is crossing the border. And Jerry Brewer on quarterback Andrew Luck’s early retirement from the NFL.
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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

Next year, the G-7 summit will be in the U.S. — and Trump wants to host it at his own resort
This year’s Group of 7 summit wrapped up Monday after a “wild three days,” according to senior economics correspondent Damian Paletta.

“At the conclusion of the summit, President Trump at his press conference really talked about unity between the leaders,” Paletta said. “But quite frankly, I saw a lot of disharmony, a lot of friction over trade.”
Another topic that came up at the news conference Monday was Trump’s desire to host next year’s meeting at his own resort in Florida.

“Doral happens to be within Miami,” the president said. “It’s a wonderful place. It’s a very, very successful area of Florida. It’s very importantly only five minutes from the airport.” David Fahrenthold covers Trump’s businesses for The Post, and he says he was not surprised that the president wanted to hold the G-7 summit at Doral. 

“This is the president of the United States using the power and prestige of the United States, its membership in this group of seven powerful countries, basically using that as a lever to get himself a convention — you know, to get some convention business into his hotel,” Fahrenthold says.

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A lot of America’s fentanyl is coming into the U.S. through legal ports of entry
Sari Horwitz has spent the past year reporting on fentanyl. It’s a synthetic opioid 50 times stronger than heroin, and it’s become a huge problem in the United States. A lot of this fentanyl is making its way in from Mexico. 

But Horwitz says fentanyl is not getting smuggled through the desert in the dark of night, in unsecured sections of the southern border — places where Trump has pushed to build or fortify walls. The reality is that almost all the fentanyl that enters the United States from Mexico comes in at official border crossings, through legal ports of entry, in a traffic jam of cars. And even though border officials know this, it’s almost impossible for them to stop it.

Horwitz went to one border crossing in San Ysidro, Calif., to see firsthand the efforts to try to find tiny amounts of fentanyl in the tens of thousands of vehicles that cross the border every day.

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Why Andrew Luck, a 29-year-old star quarterback, is quitting football
Jerry Brewer, a sports columnist for The Post, says Andrew Luck is easily one of the top quarterbacks in the National Football League. Which is why it was so shocking over the weekend when he announced his retirement from the sport at age 29.

“This is a period of enlightenment for football players in general, when you want to talk about the effects of CTE and other things that concussions and what it does to your brain,” Brewer says. “In order to have meaningful change, I do think that more people are going to have to come forward and just say the game is too dangerous right now.”

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.