Post Reports

He witnessed Michael Brown’s killing. Now Dorian Johnson is trying to get his life back on track.

Wesley Lowery takes us back to the night Michael Brown was killed in Ferguson. Damian Paletta warns of a possible recession. And Rebecca Tan on the community a simple piano can create.
Listen for free

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

The inverted yield curve and an ‘Alice in Wonderland’ economy
Yields on two- and 10-year Treasury notes inverted early Wednesday, a market phenomenon that indicates investors may have lost faith in the stability of the U.S. economy. This is the first time that the yield curve has inverted since June 2007, ahead of the Great Recession.

“I consider the inverted yield curve like a recession death grip that locks itself around the economy,” says economic reporter Damian Paletta. “The last nine recessions have been presaged by an inverted yield curve, which is why the stock market feels confident now that one will come after this one.” He says economic uncertainty is spreading around the world, too.

More on this topic:

‘He feels like he was put there for a reason — to witness these things’
In 2014, the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., exposed deep divides over race and justice in the United States and sparked a national movement for police accountability. 

Dorian Johnson provided the first witness account of what happened. That account — challenged by two law enforcement investigations and years of harassment — spawned the movement’s most powerful rallying cry: “Hands up, don’t shoot!”

Five years after Johnson all but vanished from the public eye, he sat down with reporter Wesley Lowery to give a full accounting of what he believes happened that day on Canfield Drive, including “new insight into his state of mind in the minutes and hours before the shooting itself,” Lowery says. 

More on this topic:

A night at the Purple Patch
Like nearly everyone who has stumbled into the basement of the Purple Patch in the District, reporter Rebecca Tan, who had been hunting for Southeast Asian food, found the community around its beat-up piano. 

“It’s not a complicated concept,” Tan says of the restaurant’s open-piano nights. “It’s a piano in a basement. But it brings a lot of people joy.”

More on this topic:

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.