Post Reports

High-risk lending caused the Great Recession. Could it happen again?

Damian Paletta explains the dangers of leveraged loans. Loveday Morris examines Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s standing ahead of the Israeli legislative elections. Plus, Simon Denyer in Japan’s “city of whales.”
Listen for free

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

Are we heading for another financial crisis?
In the past couple of years, there has been lots of talk about how strong the economy is — which makes Post reporter Damian Paletta nervous.

“It’s almost like a spidey sense,” he says. “Like when things are too quiet in your house — where’s the dog?”

Damian covered the Great Recession. And he recently started to notice an eerie similarity between what happened then, and what’s happening now: a pattern of deregulation and lots of banks making lots of risky loans. In this case, banks and other financial companies have issued more than a trillion dollars in risky corporate loans, as Republicans in Congress and federal regulators have sought to peel back regulations over the past two years.

“No one is really looking to see what would happen if everything goes bad at once,” Damian says.

More on this topic:

Israel’s high-stakes elections
Benjamin Netanyahu has served as Israel’s prime minister for 13 nonconsecutive years. Having survived many scandals, he’s now fighting for a fifth term in office — from under a cloud of corruption allegations, but with the support of President Trump.

The Post’s Jerusalem bureau chief Loveday Morris examines Netanyahu’s standing ahead of the elections Tuesday.

More on this topic:

In Japan’s ‘city of whales’
Last December, Japan left the International Whaling Commission and announced plans to resume commercial whaling. The caveat: They could no longer hunt for whales in Antarctic waters. Japan’s fleet would be confined to its own waters — where there aren’t as many whales.
Simon Denyer, The Post’s Tokyo bureau chief, visited Shimonoseki in western Japan as the final Antarctic whale fleet returned home.
More on this topic:

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.