Post Reports

House Democrats prepare for first impeachment vote

Mike DeBonis on what the upcoming impeachment vote means. Josh White on why the Supreme Court is considering whether a D.C. sniper should be resentenced. And Hawken Miller on the people getting coaches to improve their video game playing.
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Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

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House Democrats move to formalize impeachment inquiry
The House is expected to take its first vote on the impeachment inquiry, forcing lawmakers to publicly declare whether they support the proceedings.

Congressional reporter Mike DeBonis explains that the expected vote is the most tangible step that the House has taken aimed at removing President Trump from office, as the impeachment inquiry begins to move from behind closed doors to a more public forum. 

Republicans are denouncing the vote, saying that it signals a flaw in the process in an impeachment that was illegitimate to begin with. 

On Tuesday, Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, a Ukraine expert assigned to the National Security Council, testified in the impeachment inquiry. He is the first witness to testify who listened in on the July 25 phone call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. 

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D.C. sniper sentence reconsidered 
Seventeen years after he assisted in the killings of more than a dozen people, Lee Boyd Malvo’s jail sentence of life without parole is being reconsidered by the Supreme Court.

Since the D.C. sniper shootings, the court’s jurisprudence on juvenile murderers has changed, giving the then-minor a chance to ask for leniency in his sentence. Several victims’ families want to see his case reopened, but others who lived in D.C. at the time of the murders are unsettled.

“People were scared, and they were scared not just conceptually,” says editor Josh White, who covered the shootings in 2002 and interviewed Malvo 10 years later. “They were scared every minute of their lives that they were outside of their homes.”

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‘It’s no fun playing a game you lose all the time’
The gaming industry is expected to make $152 billion in revenue this year. The prevalence of video games and player competitions has more people turning to coaches to help them level up their gaming abilities. 

“On the higher skill level, there’s amateurs that want to get into the pro space, that can rely on these type of coaches to get them there,” says Post writer Hawken Miller. “And then there’s older dads and moms that want to be able to play with their kids but don’t have the skills to do it and need that extra hand, and that’s where coaches come in.” 

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.