Post Reports

How crib bumpers have paralyzed a U.S. consumer regulation agency

Michael Scherer with a look into how Mike Bloomberg’s wealth could influence the 2020 race. Todd Frankel reports on an agency struggling with an internal dispute over crib bumpers. And Alex Horton on a powerful weapon’s role in the impeachment inquiry.
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Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

In this episode

One more joins the pack
Billionaire Mike Bloomberg is the latest to announce a bid for the 2020 Democratic nomination. National politics reporter Michael Scherer says there are many reasons the former Republican and independent politician might want to run as a Democrat this election cycle.

“Bloomberg will say, I think explicitly, ‘Not only have I proven I can do stuff — I've been successful as a mayor, I've been successful as a businessman — but I can pay for this, too,’” Scherer says.

Bloomberg, a former New York mayor, is also one of the richest men in the United States.

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Consumer Product Safety Commission faces a battle inside the bureaucracy
A U.S. government agency is facing a quandary within its walls. Consumer safety reporter Todd C. Frankel says this all comes down to crib bumpers — the padded border made of fabric that some in the industry say is the culprit for infant deaths.

“They've come under attack from public health authorities who are just like, ‘These are not safe,’” Frankel says. And there seems to be a large group of workers and researchers within the CPSC who find themselves alarmed by the use of crib bumpers. “A generation ago, like everyone knew what a crib bumper was because they were extremely popular,” Frankel says. But there are still influential people within the agency who believe sudden infant death syndrome can’t be linked to padded crib bumpers.

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Defensive lethal aid to Ukraine in the form of Javelins
Reporter Alex Horton doesn’t really need an introduction when he has one like this: “Before my career as a reporter, I was in the Army as an infantryman,” Horton says. “And I am probably the only person in this newsroom, in a one-mile radius, that has held one of these things.”

And he knows what the anti-tank missiles have to do with the impeachment inquiry. 

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.