Post Reports

How Pete Buttigieg plans to diversify his base

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg lays out his plan to capture broader appeal. And Tara Bahrampour on a 94-year-old woman who wanted to leave life on her own terms.
Listen for free

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

How Pete Buttigieg plans to appeal to black voters
Mayer Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind. says he wants to address systemic racism in the United States. 

“This entire country is being held back and dragged down by systemic racism,” Buttigieg says. “It’s one of the things that most harms America’s present and possibility of a good future.”

That’s one of a number of listener questions host Martine Powers asked when she chatted with the Democratic presidential candidate, who has found support in key states such as New Hampshire and Iowa, but has struggled to find a foothold among more diverse electorates. 

One of the ways Buttigieg says he plans to attract voters in key states like South Carolina is with the introduction of his Douglass Plan, which he says lays out policies to help fight institutional racism.

“The Douglass Plan is not only about ensuring that we invest in equality for black Americans,” Buttigieg says. “But also, this is the way to make our country more whole.”

More on this topic:

At 94, she wanted to die on her own terms
When Rosemary Bowen hurt her back last fall, she was diagnosed with a spinal compression fracture, a common injury for people with osteoporosis. Doctors assured the otherwise-healthy 94-year-old that with physical therapy and a back brace, she would probably recover in about three months.

Instead, she announced to her family and friends that she had decided to end her life by fasting. She said she had seen too many friends have one health crisis lead to another, leading to a decline she didn’t want to endure. After saying her goodbyes, she stopped eating, and in the early morning of the eighth day of her fast, she died in her sleep.

“She asked her daughter to film the fast,” reporter Tara Bahrampour says. “Her daughter said it was excruciating. But she said it was also really one of the most moving experiences she’s ever had.”

More on this topic:

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.