How to fix a labor shortage
A “Help wanted” sign is displayed at a boardwalk restaurant in Wildwood, N.J. Many resort community retail businesses are suffering from a shortage of labor. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Across the country, businesses have a problem: Workers aren’t taking low-wage jobs. Economics reporter Eli Rosenberg talked to employers who think they have found a solution: paying people more.

Before returning to their home states last month, some lawmakers expressed concerns over safety and sought out funding for additional security. Now, House members have returned to the Hill, where they don’t necessarily feel much safer. Marianna Sotomayor reports

A new kind of space race: Billionaires are competing to launch into space. Others can come along — but only if they can afford astronomical prices. Space travel reporter Christian Davenport has more.

If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners — one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe.
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How to fix a labor shortage
A “Help wanted” sign is displayed at a boardwalk restaurant in Wildwood, N.J. Many resort community retail businesses are suffering from a shortage of labor. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Across the country, businesses have a problem: Workers aren’t taking low-wage jobs. Economics reporter Eli Rosenberg talked to employers who think they have found a solution: paying people more.

Before returning to their home states last month, some lawmakers expressed concerns over safety and sought out funding for additional security. Now, House members have returned to the Hill, where they don’t necessarily feel much safer. Marianna Sotomayor reports

A new kind of space race: Billionaires are competing to launch into space. Others can come along — but only if they can afford astronomical prices. Space travel reporter Christian Davenport has more.

If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners — one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe.
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An insular Christian group faces a reckoning over sexual misconduct. And, the extraordinary effort from educators to get kids back to school.
Monday, June 14, 2021
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What Biden’s summit with Putin can tell us about the future of U.S.-Russia relations. And, what could happen to struggling tenants when the rent comes due in July.
Wednesday, June 16, 2021