Post Reports

Impeachment trial? What impeachment trial?

Mike DeBonis explains the impeachment trial’s delay. Liz Sly unravels the fraught history of U.S.-Iraq relations. And Kayla Epstein assuages young people’s concerns about the draft.
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Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

In this episode

Why a Senate impeachment trial still hasn’t happened
On Monday, former national security adviser John Bolton scrambled Senate Republicans’ impeachment strategy, declaring his willingness to testify in trial and upping pressure on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to summon him as a witness. 

“He knows more than just about anybody involved in this about what the president’s actual motivations may have been, what he did and why he did it,” congressional reporter Mike DeBonis says of Bolton. “To have him now dangling the possibility that he has something potentially explosive to say has really cast a new light on this trial.”

This development came as President Trump and congressional Republicans ramped up pressure on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) to transmit articles of impeachment to the Senate, allowing a trial to begin in that chamber. 

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How the tenuous U.S.-Iraq relationship came to be
Since the drone strike on Iranian Maj. Gen. Qasem Soleimani in Iraq, Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi has called the attack “a massive breach of sovereignty” and a “clear breach of the terms of the American forces’ presence” in Iraq. 

But last week’s action wasn’t the first to stoke tension between the United States and Iraq, whose fraught history has been laid bare in the strike’s wake, says Beirut bureau chief Liz Sly

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Military draft anxiety — not totally a joke online
Traffic to the Selective Service System website spiked after President Trump announced the U.S.-authorized killing of a high-ranking Iranian military commander.
 
“I think a lot of people’s minds went to the worst-case scenario for what that would mean,” national writer Kayla Epstein says. “As can happen on the Internet, people started to get hyperbolic about it. There were memes about the impending start of World War III and getting drafted into that hypothetical conflict.”

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.