Post Reports

Intel official blows a whistle on Trump's interaction with world leader

Shane Harris on the whistleblower rattling the intelligence community. Juliet Eilperin explains the president’s move to take away California’s ability to set its own emission standards. And Maura Judkis on the legal challenges of opening a cannabis cafe.
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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

Whistleblower complaint rattles intelligence community
A whistleblower report filed with the inspector general for the intelligence community has jolted Congress. It concerns a “promise” made by President Trump to a foreign leader, according to two former U.S. officials familiar with the matter. 

“We first found out about the complaint late last Friday evening, when Adam Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, put out a letter that he had written to the director of national intelligence,” says intelligence reporter Shane Harris

Post reporters on Thursday broke news of the content of the report, which raises new concerns about the president’s handling of sensitive information and could further strain his relationship with U.S. spy agencies.

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California’s fight with Trump over tailpipe emissions
The Trump administration is revoking California’s power to limit carbon pollution from cars and light trucks. The move is expected to spark a legal battle with the nation’s most populous state. 

“What they’re really doing is upending a system in which California for decades has driven environmental advancements in this area, essentially,” says senior national correspondent Juliet Eilperin

The state has had a special waiver allowing it to set regulations separate from federal standards since the Clean Air Act of 1970. The administration’s latest move to scratch this waiver could have a national impact, as 13 other states and the District of Columbia follow California’s standards for tailpipe emissions.

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‘It’s going to look like a neighborhood place — but with weed’
The country’s first “cannabis cafe” is set to open next week in Los Angeles, with farm-to-table dining and smoking options enabled by a complicated patchwork of regulations.

“One of the biggest obstacles here is that West Hollywood passed an ordinance that would allow these cannabis cafes and lounges to operate,” says food reporter Maura Judkis. “But there is no such license at the state level. There’s only dispensary licenses.”

Judkis spoke with chef Andrea Drummer of Lowell Farms to learn about the compromises she’s had to make to open her restaurant. One big one: “They can’t actually infuse the food,” Judkis says.

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.